Substance Use Linked to Violence

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Substance Use Linked to Violence
7
Mon, 04-08-2013 - 1:26pm

I think it is common knowledge that substance use and abuse is linked to violence. Many studies have been done showing a link.

Here's one random article:

http://www.psychiatrictimes.com/suicide/content/article/10168/1780669

So -- imagine my surprise when I read this:

Anyone who is voluntarily admitted to a psychiatric hospital, except those solely on the basis of drug or alcohol use, will have to wait six months before being able to obtain a gun permit. The individual will also not be allowed to possess a firearm during those six months.

So, if you have substance abuse - a known risk factor for violence - then you do not have to wait for a gun permit. If you have another mental illness, not linked to violence, then you do have to wait.

Huh?!

Avatar for xxxs
Community Leader
Registered: 01-25-2010
Tue, 04-09-2013 - 11:32pm
The law of unintended consequences

dragowoman

Avatar for xxxs
Community Leader
Registered: 01-25-2010
Tue, 04-09-2013 - 11:30pm

  Which means smart people will never go for any mental health reason.  It is too dangerous for the individual.

dragowoman

Avatar for xxxs
Community Leader
Registered: 01-25-2010
Tue, 04-09-2013 - 11:29pm

 Good.  Violence takes many different channels and can be seen in different angles.  In political correct land everything is soft and fuzzy.  In real life it is not.   These articles are meant for professionally educated and trained persons not general public.   One of the first things young students are taught is that they are not therapists.  It is dangerous for layperson to read into anything.

     Most state you need a permit only to carry anyway.  There is no reason for a waiting period but to discourage gun buyers.  Unfortunately it also harms those who may need to protect themselves.  Police cannot protect only respond.  Unlike billionaires who have armed guards with automatic weapons.  The average citizen is on their own.

dragowoman

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Mon, 04-08-2013 - 8:58pm

Mandated background checks will require people to sign away their privacy and give access to their mental health records in order to buy guns.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Mon, 04-08-2013 - 2:48pm

Do background checks violate HIPPA?

I think background checks have their place but like many things, there's only so much you're going to get access to.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Mon, 04-08-2013 - 1:37pm

Is there any other reason to impliment "background checks" for history of mental illness - other than prejudice? Why do we condone this type of discrimination?

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Mon, 04-08-2013 - 1:31pm

According to the Charlotte Observer, giving the local sheriff access to mental health records resulted in the following decisions:

Should Sheriff Have Access to Mental Health Records?

http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2013/04/07/3964790/gun-permits-should-nc-sheriffs.htmlWho should get a permit?

To understand the challenges facing sheriffs and judges in deciding whether a person should be allowed to carry a concealed gun, consider a few of the cases filed in big black binders in Bell’s office on the ninth floor of the Mecklenburg County courthouse:

• One applicant was a divorcee fearful of her ex-husband, but denied a concealed weapons permit by the Sheriff’s Office because she was committed to Broughton Hospital as a child for mental health treatment.

• Another applicant was a high-end watch salesman who sought a permit to carry a concealed weapon for protection on his job. He was denied by the Sheriff’s Office because he had threatened to kill himself in 2001 after he broke up with his girlfriend.

• A 23-year-old man was sent for counseling by his high school social worker in 2007 because of suicidal thoughts after his mother died. “I was young and I was still grieving over my mother’s death ...,” he wrote in asking Bell to overturn the Sheriff’s denial.

• A veteran tried to kill himself while serving in Iraq in 2005. “I have never thought of it again,” he wrote. “I have been seeing mental health at the VA since 2009. I do not believe the denial is right. Having a weapon makes me feel safer.” According to notes from the VA Medical Center in Salisbury, the man no longer has suicidal thoughts.

• A 68-year-old veteran of Vietnam and Iraq has a history PTSD, depressive neurosis and alcohol abuse. He is taking medications and keeps regular appointments at the Veterans Administration Hospital.


Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2013/04/07/3964790/gun-permits-should-nc-sheriffs.html#storylink=cpy