Super-Sized Soft Drinks Are Out!

Avatar for cmkristy
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-05-2005
Super-Sized Soft Drinks Are Out!
22
Thu, 09-13-2012 - 11:38am

NEW YORK -- The vote is in, and super-sized soft drinks are out.

New York City's Board of Health approved Mayor Michael Bloomberg's proposed ban on big-size sugary beverages.

The measure, which could go into effect as early as March, places a 16-ounce cap on bottled drinks and fountain beverages sold at New York City restaurants, movie theaters, sports venues and street carts.

It applies to sugary drinks that have more than 25 calories per 8 ounces. It would not affect 100% juice or beverages with more than 50% milk or milk substitute.

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/story/2012/09/13/supersized-drinks-on-the-way-out-in-nyc/57775970/1?csp=fbfanpage

Wow!  I am a bit surprised that this ban was approved!  What do you think about it?  Agree or not?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2009
Fri, 09-14-2012 - 11:27am

I agree with you, owaitress. We do not have the size of drinks you have down south but the sizes have increased as chains compete for the decreasing "fast food" dollar.

Obesity is a serious problem that places a strain on the health care system and on the economy. And that should be everyone's concern. Healthy workers take less sick leave and are more productive. And banning super-sized portions of these high-caloric, low nutritional drinks is an simple way to help with this.

It forces the chains to compete more on quality of food, then on portion sizes. It is about making a small change in the cultural of over-consumption with the potential of huge long term benefits. (i.e. A super-sized 42oz Coke has about 410 calories, which is about 21% of a daily 2000 calorie diet with NO nutrional value. A can of coke has about 100 calories,5%.)

This has nothing to do with policing people; they are free to buy as many multiple servings of these high-caloric, low nutritional drinks as they wish. But perhaps if it hits them where it hurts (in their wallet), they will ask for water and/or reduce their consummation.

Just an observation but I am constantly shocked by the increasing number of over-weight young people I see on our streets. When I was young (I am pushing 60), it was rare to see a chubby young person. Now it seems to be more commonplace, especially amongst our young girls. I don't think it is only related to exercise;  diet is an important factor. 

I sigh whenever I see a young girl walking around with one of those ice-caps (i.e. liquid creme) or soft drinks (liquid sugar). They are setting themselves up for a lifetime of weight problems.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-11-2012
Fri, 09-14-2012 - 9:44am
bunnierose wrote:

 I find this insulting! The assumption that people are unable to control/police themselves and must be taken care of by the government like a bunch of children in day care?  What next? Shall we have the government take over the bank accounts of people who are too undisciplined to pay their bills on time?

Our hand out/entitlement/welfare system has encouraged personal irresponsibility and lack of self discipline. No one really has to pay bills, eat sensibly, exercise, or work because there is a huge safety net. If you run up debt and can't pay-file bankruptsy. If you overeat and get sick-get disability and let everyone else pay for your medical bills-medicaid. If the government does not step in to undo the damage these safety nets have caused, then who is going to?  

I fail to see what role obesity has in national security issues. Please explain.

 Really? The latest studies show 2/3 of the adult population is obese and overweight. The number one reason why adults can't qualify for military service is obesity. That is indeed a national security problem.

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-16-1999
Fri, 09-14-2012 - 7:00am
owaitress wrote:

Good! I am glad someone is doing something about the obesity problem. I know people aren't happy with being told what they can and can't eat or drink, but something needs to be done. Drastic solutions are obviously necessary since people can no longer seem to police themselves.Obesity is not only a health care crisis, it is a national security issues. This is a step in the right direction however hard it may be for some people to accept.

I find this insulting! The assumption that people are unable to control/police themselves and must be taken care of by the government like a bunch of children in day care?  What next? Shall we have the government take over the bank accounts of people who are too undisciplined to pay their bills on time? How about we lock up everyone who can't manage to stay clean and sober after a stint in rehab?

I fail to see what role obesity has in national security issues. Please explain.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-18-2006
Thu, 09-13-2012 - 9:26pm

I disagree - if something is so bad they feel the need to limit it, make it illegal or give up restricting it. I get the obesity problem in this country. I don't think this will solve the problem. Look at all the health problems that cigarettes cause, yet they are still legal. Same goes for alcohol. Go big or go home, if something is a legal substance people should be held responsible for their own choices.

Angie

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-11-2012
Thu, 09-13-2012 - 1:15pm

Good! I am glad someone is doing something about the obesity problem. I know people aren't happy with being told what they can and can't eat or drink, but something needs to be done. Drastic solutions are obviously necessary since people can no longer seem to police themselves.Obesity is not only a health care crisis, it is a national security issues. This is a step in the right direction however hard it may be for some people to accept.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-23-2012
Thu, 09-13-2012 - 12:13pm

I personally think it's ridiculous. I get that obesity is a concern, but exactly where do we draw the line with people being responsible for making their own choices, if the government is going to constantly try to mandate every little thing in our lives? It's the little things like this that gradually give way to more and more government manipulations.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-30-2011
Thu, 09-13-2012 - 11:59am

Totally disagree, it's not up to the city on what I choose to put in my body.  What really gets me is that they overcharge so much for soda as it is, so you will be having to pay more when you are thirstier than a 16 oz drink.   Did they mention if it will affect free refills?  

Chelsea

"Minds are like parachutes. They only function when they are open."

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