Supervised Teen Drinking?

Avatar for cmkristy
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-05-2005
Supervised Teen Drinking?
5
Fri, 11-01-2013 - 8:19am

You couldn’t blame Maryland Attorney General Douglas Gansler if he poured himself a stiff drink this week.

A Democratic candidate for governor, Gansler has come under heavy fire in recent days for not taking any action to stop underage drinking at a party that his son attended last summer to celebrate his high school graduation.

The brouhaha arose after a photograph surfaced showing Gansler at the beach-house party—amid a sea of dancing, fist-pumping, bathing-suit-clad teens—looking for his boy.

Gansler and the other parents drew up house rules designed to make sure their kids stayed out of harm’s way: no driving, no swimming after dark, no girls behind closed doors, no hard alcohol or drugs. They held a meeting before “Beach Week” explaining these rules to their children and made clear that breaking them meant being sent home. And they assigned two dads to chaperone each night.

Conspicuously left off the house-rules list, however, was any prohibition against drinking beer or wine. While purists may argue that this amounted to condoning illegal behavior, it is exactly the kind of balancing act that sensible parents of high school students find themselves performing all the time.


Read more: Parents see Maryland AG Gansler's side on supervised teen drinking | TIME.com http://healthland.time.com/2013/10/25/give-parents-a-break-making-the-case-for-supervised-teen-drinking/#ixzz2jOamXMwy

Controversial topic for sure! How do you feel about supervised teen drinking?  Is it a good idea?  

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Sun, 11-03-2013 - 7:19am

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>Nice stretch of imagination you've got there, Lol.</p><p>And the op was talking about a party (not just allowing it for your own teen but a crowd of teens "supervised") of which I further disagree. This topic comes up pretty regularly and graduation parties seem to be a common toss up in whether to offer it or not if at least for the adult company.</p><p> </p>

So you will not stand by your comment that breaking the law is never ok? How was I supposed to know that you meant breaking teenage drinking laws is never ok? Are any laws, IYO, ok to break?

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Sun, 11-03-2013 - 6:53am

Nice stretch of imagination you've got there, Lol.

And the op was talking about a party (not just allowing it for your own teen but a crowd of teens "supervised") of which I further disagree. This topic comes up pretty regularly and graduation parties seem to be a common toss up in whether to offer it or not if at least for the adult company.

 

 

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Sat, 11-02-2013 - 7:22pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>Well, Breaking laws is never ok. I don't know where MD stands on underage drinking but my kids learn about alchohol and drug abuse in school, they know the legal age and they also know the risks and consequences of drugs too. If dad excuses away a little alchohol for a graduation party what else is he excusing or just sweeping under the rug as no big deal...</p><p> </p>

Breaking the law is sometimes the best, most moral thing to do. i am a proponent of civil disobedience for cause. The Boston Tea Party, Underground Railroad, Anne Frank, Berlin Wall, Rosa Parks, Susan B Anthony and of course, Jesus are good examples. Like Ashmama, a little alcohol for an older teen within the family is ok in our house and not against the law in our state. I would never provide some for anyone outside our family.

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Sat, 11-02-2013 - 9:48am

Well, Breaking laws is never ok. I don't know where MD stands on underage drinking but my kids learn about alchohol and drug abuse in school, they know the legal age and they also know the risks and consequences of drugs too. If dad excuses away a little alchohol for a graduation party what else is he excusing or just sweeping under the rug as no big deal...

 

 

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Fri, 11-01-2013 - 9:34am

We did allow our daughter to drink in our house (our son never wants any), but did not ever serve her friends. Why? Because the law in our state (and most other states) says we can legally serve our own children in our home, but not other people's children. Respect for the law starts at home, with the parents. Parents who serve other kids are playing with fire, IMO.

I'm not sure lowering the drinking age would be all that helpful in curbing binge drinking, either. In Britain, where the legal age is 18, they have a huge problem with binge drinking and alcoholism among the very young. But I do think something more could be done in this country.

In our case at least, making alcohol a normal thing--we would occasionally offer our kids a glass of wine at dinner--did seem to take the mystery out of it. Our D doesn't party and doesn't much care for people whose idea of a good time has to involve alcohol. She intentionally chose a college where partying isn't a major part of the social life.

Our son, who is 16, hates the taste of alcohol and hangs out with a group of geeky kids who don't drink.

I can't honestly say whether we did things right or just got lucky with the type of kids we have, but I do think having a rational attitude toward alcohol must have helped a little.