Homeschool - more girls than boys

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-16-2005
Homeschool - more girls than boys
40
Tue, 08-03-2010 - 10:06am

I was reading about our local homeschool rates increasing, this article (2009) was posted in the comments section.


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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-02-2009
Tue, 08-03-2010 - 10:17am

That is interesting.

 

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Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Tue, 08-03-2010 - 10:19am

Those are high percentages, but I am not that surprised. Already when dd was small, i.e. preschool age, I started running into those educated, higher income people choosing to homeschool. I also considered it seriously at one point, mostly because of my dissatisfaction with our local schools and also for cultural reasons. The latter in the sense that I wanted her to read classics, learn some art history, play classical music, learn a foreign language properly etc. IOW, I was dissatisfied both with the methods of teaching and the actual content.

Thankfully we have escaped the more obnoxious manifestations of teen culture in the schools dd attended. It's not that it does not exist here, we just lucked out, I think, and staying away from the chi-chi private schools around here helped.


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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-16-2005
Tue, 08-03-2010 - 10:31am
I personally could not homeschool.


iVillage Member
Registered: 04-02-2009
Tue, 08-03-2010 - 10:37am

I haven't the patience, either.

 

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iVillage Member
Registered: 07-15-2010
Tue, 08-03-2010 - 11:09am

Because there are no MEAN homeschooled kids, neighborhood kids, soccer team kids, brothers, sisters or cousins and there are definitely no mean girl scouts! ;-)

I don't need to experience meanness on a recurring basis in order to learn how to properly react to it. There are plenty of opportunities for that experience in the real world--where homeschoolers live.

Where in the world does one spend 6 to 8 hours a day cooped up with their random age mates with little to no control or say-so over how their day is spent? I'd say that your typical school environment is much less representative of the "real world" than any homeschooling environment I've ever seen--and I've seen a lot of them up close and personal.

Are there some random strange ones here and there? No doubt. Find those in any group.




Edited 8/3/2010 5:47 pm ET by gripcon
>>Luck is what you call it when preparation meets opportunity<<
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-27-2009
Tue, 08-03-2010 - 11:43am

I would never be able to do it. I don't have the patience or the skill. Just helping with homework is hard enough. I am not surprised about the Mean girl, no mean boys..;)


iVillage Member
Registered: 11-27-2009
Tue, 08-03-2010 - 11:56am

My sister homeschooled 6 kids through highschool. What they missed by not being exposed to some of what my kids have been in public high school has not hindered them at all.
The were able to do theater, music, sports, play on sports teams, art programs, debate and speaking teams, etc. Homeschool communities develop and parents with certain skills teach classes in their homes or at park districts, libraries, where ever to other homeschooled children. They even had gym class.
My sisters kids worked from the time they were 15 and could get a workers permit.
They were never isolated from the typical kid conflicts, they even experienced a "mean girl" or two. The only thing I think they missed was the opportunities of the advanced classes at the high school level, which varies from high school to high school. With the present economy and lack of education money many public schools are cutting back on these. I know in our district if the class doesn't have at least 20 students, it's gone this year. That could effect some of the AP level classes.
I think another thing they missed was the foul language and exposure to underage drinking and drug abuse.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-27-2009
Tue, 08-03-2010 - 12:03pm
I am really happy that your sister could do it. Like I said I couldn't.
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-15-2010
Tue, 08-03-2010 - 12:05pm

A lot depends on what your school district offers as well. In our area homeschooled kids could attend school "part-time" no more than 3 hours per day. This way if they offered a class you couldn't otherwise find for them it was available to your homeschooled kid.

I know plenty a homeschooled kid who attended our county's gifted program which was a once-a-week pull-out program so they attended school once-a-week. In 7th and 8th grade school my kids took an advanced mathematics class, along with Spanish. They were going to take an advanced language arts class as well but it would have required they remain through lunch and that was definitely a no-go. This allowed them to start high school with credit for two HS classes (Algebra and Spanish I). So they could start HS taking Geometry and Spanish 2.

Many of our local private schools also offered their programs part time to the homeschooling community. It really just amounts to a truly personalize educational experience for the student.


>>Luck is what you call it when preparation meets opportunity<<
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-15-2010
Tue, 08-03-2010 - 12:11pm

You actually should be pleased to learn you have it the opposite. Her sister's children are the "norm" when it comes to homeschooling.

You don't really think that a parent who chooses to homeschool does so for the purpose of isolation? In fact most go out their way to insure a whole range of opportunities are made available to their children that they might not otherwise get in school. The point is to give them a better experience--not to isolate or brain-wash them.


>>Luck is what you call it when preparation meets opportunity<<

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