New Pope: Does he matter politically?

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-15-2009
New Pope: Does he matter politically?
9
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 12:32pm

After Pope Francis I was announced yesterday, I noticed a lot of comments in my FB newsfeed from people who think this isn't news or that it doesn't really matter.  Do you think the pope has any political influence or do you think it really doesn't matter?

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Wed, 03-27-2013 - 5:59am
Not all baptized Catholics practice later on. And unless the church is pulling buried certificates of baptism to record their numbers a more accurate number are those recorded on parish registries. Besides, Some churches deny "baptized" Catholics the opportunity to marry in the church or baptize their own children if there's no record that you're still a practicing Catholic!

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2009
Tue, 03-26-2013 - 9:19am

It would be..

but "registration" in the Catholic Church is being baptisted in the Catholic Church. Once baptisted Catholic, you are always Catholic in the eyes of the Church. If the Church based its estimate on number of people listed on Church rolls...

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Tue, 03-19-2013 - 8:00am
The number of registered Catholics is a more accurate number than the number baptised, IMO.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2009
Sun, 03-17-2013 - 2:30pm

The Pope, in my opinion, remains a moral influence just like any other religious leader. His holiness and the "good works" of adherents to his religion in the name of the poor and disadvantage is respected.

He may still have some political clout in 3rd world countries but, in some Western countries, I doubt that his views will sway political decisions. It doesn't in my country.

The estimated number of Catholics cloud the issue because the 1.2 billion number is an inflated number. It is based on the number of people baptised Catholic, not the number of people who actually consider themselves Catholic. I am sure that a vast number of those 1.2 billion "Catholics" are cultural Catholics.

For example, according to the Vatican, in 2012, 46% of Canadians are Catholic. According to the latest published stats from Canadian census data, the number of people who said that they are "Catholic" is 43%. I know, only a 3% difference but since Canadian Stats are based on 2005 data, one would expect that percentage would have decrease since Canadian's non-European population is growing.

The most "Catholic" province is my home province, with about half of the Catholics live.  83% of its population self-identify with the Catholic Church. However, that self-identification is cultural, not spiritual.  Of those 83%, only 6% actually attend mass on a regular basis.

The decline of the influence of the Catholic Church was very rapid and is one of the outcomes of what we call here "The Quiet Revolution". Within a decade (i.e. the 60s), Quebec went from being one of the most Catholic to one of the least Catholic societies.

This is the province where birth control has been readily available since the 60s; where women from other provinces would go to obtain abortions;where common law (civil) marriages are the majority (over 52% of babies last year were born to common law marriages). This is province that legalized civil unions (gave them the same rights as partners in traditional marriages) for both same-sex and male-female couples in 2002. It also was the 3rd province to give Gays the right to marry in 2004.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-17-2012
Fri, 03-15-2013 - 11:57pm

As the religious leader of 1.2 BILLION people, I'd say yes, the Pope is pretty politically significant.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Fri, 03-15-2013 - 3:28am
The pontiff is a leader of the church. My Fb feed went crazy too, What I don't like are the immediate reactions that the church needs to change in radical ways that not only include female priests but also stands on homosexuality and other moral divides that for history have always separated the church from other political institutions like our federal government. I like that this pope is a simple man with humble roots, I don't expect him to tweet like his predecessor did.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2009
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 1:51pm

The Bishop of Rome (the Pope) with the Dalia Lama are significant moral leader in the world.

The Church may not have the political clout it had in the middle ages but it is still an important force in the world. After all, there are a billion people in the world who have been baptised in the Catholic Church. And in parts of the world, it is growing.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-09-2010
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 12:42pm

The Christian religion as a whole is seeing a decline in numbers world wide. It comes as no surprise that people would not consider the Pope as influential.

I personally feel that the leaders of all major religions have great influence on world politics whether people want to believe/accept it or not.

Nancy
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-24-2012
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 12:39pm

I made a similar comment yesterday too. But I admit that I'm not Catholic so I'll be really interested to read any responses from Catholics to see if & how the Pope does affect political or everday life.