Ousted Fla GOP Head Expresses Regret

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Registered: 11-11-1999
Ousted Fla GOP Head Expresses Regret
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Wed, 09-15-2010 - 12:14pm


Indicted former Republican Party of Florida Chairman Jim Greer says he has discovered "racist views" within the GOP and is sorry he helped fuel a national firestorm last year over a speech by President Obama to America's schoolchildren.

The Florida GOP didn't respond to Greer's accusation. Palm Beach County Republican Chairman Sid Dinerstein called Greer "pathetic" and accused him of trying to damage the party and help his old friend, Republican-turned-independent Gov. Charlie Crist, in his Senate bid against GOP nominee Marco Rubio.

When the White House last year announced plans for the president to deliver a back-to-school message to students, Greer accused Obama of seeking to indoctrinate the nation's youth in "socialist ideology."

Since then, Greer has been ousted from his party post and indicted on fraud, theft and money-laundering charges stemming from his partnership in a consulting firm that got a 10 percent cut of donations to the GOP. Greer has pleaded not guilty.

On Saturday, current Florida GOP Chairman John Thrasher said the party is considering suing Greer, Crist and Greer's former top aide to recover "inappropriate expenses" they billed to the party.

Greer's attorney called the party's threats "political grandstanding."

Greer today said the timing of his Monday night statement wasn't related to Saturday's actions but to coincide with Obama's second back-to-school address, which was delivered today in Philadelphia without the hullabaloo that accompanied last year's remarks.

"In the year since I issued a prepared statement regarding President Obama speaking to the nation's school children, I have learned a great deal about the party I so deeply loved and served," Greer's statement said. "Unfortunately, I found that many within the GOP have racist views and I apologize to the President for my opposition to his speech last year and my efforts to placate the extremists who dominate our Party today. My children and I look forward to the President's speech."

more

http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/state/ousted-fla-gop-head-regrets-his-obama-attack-916020.html

dablacksox



Cynic: a blackguard whose faulty vision sees things as they are, not as they ought to be.---Ambrose Bierce, The Devil's Dictionary.

dablacksox


Cynic: a blackguard whose faulty vision sees things as they are, not as they ought to be.---Ambrose Bierce, The Devil's Dictionary.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-30-2007
Wed, 09-15-2010 - 12:31pm
I was born in the 50's, grew up in the 60's. I remember all the racist, hatred that was around then. Here it is a different century and still the racist remarks and hatred. I hear it almost every single day. I was brought up to "Respect" the President. It is lacking today. I do remember people making remarks about JFK. Which I never understood. But nothing like today. I thought we had moved past this. But when you're standing in line at the grocery store and hear remarks about Obama's race, family heritage and his citizenship, I have to wonder, how far have we come?
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-16-2005
Wed, 09-15-2010 - 2:16pm
Personally I think he is mad because of the felony charges and the GOP pursuing him for breaking the law.


iVillage Member
Registered: 11-11-1999
Wed, 09-15-2010 - 2:20pm

Not sure. It reminds me some of Lee Atwater, who made the rounds begging forgiveness of everyone he slimed after he found out he had cancer.

Nothing clarifies the mind like an imminent hanging---Samuel Johnson

dablacksox



Cynic: a blackguard whose faulty vision sees things as they are, not as they ought to be.---Ambrose Bierce, The Devil's Dictionary.

dablacksox


Cynic: a blackguard whose faulty vision sees things as they are, not as they ought to be.---Ambrose Bierce, The Devil's Dictionary.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-28-2010
Wed, 09-15-2010 - 2:21pm
I don't know, but I've heard from a few on here that though someone may have done something reprehensible (ie Newt) that
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-16-2005
Wed, 09-15-2010 - 2:23pm
I could see if he had cancer, but given he is facing jail for felonies and corruption by the people he is turning on just doesn't give him any substance, IMO.








iVillage Member
Registered: 01-22-2000
Wed, 09-15-2010 - 2:26pm

No, not like Atwater...more like congressman Massa...who had his own problems, then tried to turn on Obama and Rahm in an attempt to sully their names and reps.



This guy in Fla is a joke. Sour grapes.



Sonny

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-16-2008
Wed, 09-15-2010 - 2:32pm

<<<I could see if he had cancer, but given he is facing jail for felonies and corruption by the people he is turning on just doesn't give him any substance, IMO.>>>



Exactly.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-16-2005
Wed, 09-15-2010 - 2:33pm
He could hope for a pardon :)








iVillage Member
Registered: 11-11-1999
Wed, 09-15-2010 - 2:39pm

No, like Atwater.....

==============================================

Lee Atwater's sorrow for the road taken

Timeless character

By James Hebert
ARTS WRITER

May 19, 2006

He loved the blues, and he hated to lose.

Those two simple characteristics say a lot about what made Lee Atwater tick. And yet there was nothing simple about Atwater, the Republican strategist who masterminded George H.W. Bush's presidential win in 1988 and changed the nature of politics in the process.

He was a middle-class boy from South Carolina who scraped his way into the upper-crusty Bush's inner circle and eventually gained infamy for the Willie Horton attack ad, a ploy many condemned as racist.

But he also was an accomplished blues guitarist, a devotee of that African-American art form and a pal of the blues great B.B. King.

And when he was diagnosed with brain cancer in 1990, Harvey LeRoy Atwater found religion and sought forgiveness, apologizing to former foes and lamenting the “tumor of the soul” that afflicted America. And maybe, by extension, himself.

Atwater was a mentor to Karl Rove, the current President Bush's longtime adviser, and the kinds of tough campaign tactics that have become common today are a key part of the late strategist's legacy.

“Politics has always been a dirty game,” says Rosina Reynolds, who is directing the Cygnet production. “But I think that probably what happened with Atwater is this whole gutter politics, this whole (credo of) attack politics really took off at that time.

The nature of the ad also fit into Atwater's history of ruthless and bruising campaign methods.

In one 1980 congressional race in South Carolina, a Democratic candidate named Tom Turnipseed later recalled, “Atwater's antics included phony polls by 'independent pollsters' to 'inform' white suburbanites that I was a member of the NAACP, because my congressman opponent was afraid to publicly say so.”

Turnipseed was one of those to whom Atwater eventually apologized, as part of his outpouring of contrition (and embrace of religion) as his cancer spread.

According to “Bad Boy,” John Brady's 1996 Atwater biography, Atwater was at a Republican fund-raiser, ridiculing Dukakis' emblematic and disastrous '88 photo op in a military tank, when he was felled by the seizure that led to his cancer diagnosis.

Dukakis is the person to whom Atwater most famously apologized, in a startlingly candid, first-person piece in Life magazine published two months before his death.

Atwater recounted how, speaking of Dukakis during the '88 campaign, he promised to “strip the bark off the little bastard” and “make Willie Horton his running mate.”

Then he said: “I am sorry for both statements . . . the first for its naked cruelty, the second because it makes me sound racist, which I am not.”

He also observed: “I used to say that the President might be kinder and gentler, but I wasn't going to be. How wrong I was. There is nothing more important in life than human beings.”

Atwater's lament about America's “tumor of the soul” was a response to the acquisitiveness of the 1980s, which he felt had contributed to “a spiritual vacuum at the heart of American society.”

http://www.signonsandiego.com/uniontrib/20060519/news_1c19fixin.html

dablacksox



Cynic: a blackguard whose faulty vision sees things as they are, not as they ought to be.---Ambrose Bierce, The Devil's Dictionary.

dablacksox


Cynic: a blackguard whose faulty vision sees things as they are, not as they ought to be.---Ambrose Bierce, The Devil's Dictionary.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-22-2000
Wed, 09-15-2010 - 3:10pm

Sorry, disagree.



The Atwater story is a man who played very hard politics, and as he faced death, had an experience of faith in his life. He then sought to make amends for things he has done to some people he felt he had wronged.



Massa was on his way out, for improprieties and scandal. He was not backed by his party, or the leaders. He felt betrayed. He then sought to make political hay by striking out and saying nasty things about his party. The repubs certainly grabbed hold of it for a short time, until it became clear he was self serving and could not be trusted.



The dude in FLA is in the same position. He was arrested, indicted and is about to go on trial for crimes committed largely against the GOP. Having no one want to, or be able to, back him from his former employer/party, he is obviously seeking to strike out against the GOP by saying false things. I plays well, hopefully for a similarly short time as Massa's story did with the GOP, with the opposition party. However, he will be shown to be full of as much bunk as Massa was.



Sonny

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