Planned Obsolescence

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2011
Planned Obsolescence
17
Sat, 02-04-2012 - 10:57am

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-03-2011
Sat, 02-04-2012 - 1:24pm
From your link: "If you want to drive Planned Parenthood out of the abortion business, don’t send them less money. Send them more. Help Planned Parenthood become what it has wanted to be all along: The organization that helps women avoid unwanted pregnancies, so they don’t have to abort them."

Yes, that's exactly it. I simply don't understand wanting to put Planned Parenthood out of business since they provide so much in the way of contraceptives and education about contraceptives to people who don't want to get pregnant.
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Tue, 02-07-2012 - 10:50am
300,000 abortions is still pretty alarming.. I'll have to look up the numbers of adoptions.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 03-03-2009
Tue, 02-07-2012 - 11:16am

Considering the number of sexually active women in the United States, a figure of 300,000 abortions is peanuts.

There will always be a need for alternatives when contraception fails, so I don't think the idea of obsolescence for abortion providers is realistic.

As regards adoptions, it's been my experience that many women with unexpected pregnancies, don't want to be mothers OR be pregnant.

The number of abortions compared to the number of adoptions is irrelevant.

Jabberwocka

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2011
Tue, 02-07-2012 - 11:24am

In a country with 160 million women...

yet, the number can go lower - by supporting the other services PP and similar organisations provide, universal health care, and sex ed.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-03-2011
Tue, 02-07-2012 - 11:32am
When you look at it that way, the number is miniscule.

I think pretty much everyone in this country wants to see the number of abortions decrease. What I don't get is the conservative position of not providing birth control, sex ed, etc. It just doesn't make sense.
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2011
Tue, 02-07-2012 - 12:17pm

Agreed, and now the Catholic church and right wing folks run around acting all outrageous the law will require contraceptives coverage with no cost. Such disingenuousness.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Tue, 02-07-2012 - 3:49pm
I am a proponent of sex ed, but how it's taught should be individual to each school, family and/or teachers. You won't find catholic schools teaching sex ed the way public schools do nor should it be the same.... Universal mandadates like the HHS bill violate our Amendment but I will wait for the final verdict about that. In the meantime, public policy sounds convincing but it's not the solution.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2011
Tue, 02-07-2012 - 4:11pm

I am a proponent of sex ed, but how it's taught should be individual to each school, family and/or teachers. You won't find catholic schools teaching sex ed the way public schools do nor should it be the same.... Universal mandadates like the HHS bill violate our Amendment but I will wait for the final verdict about that. In the meantime, public policy sounds convincing but it's not the solution.

Really? So cabbage patches and such would be acceptable? Science, please. Kids can handle the truth. As with any subject, knowledge is built in increments.

My first eight years of school were in a Catholic one, through 8th grade. Boys separated from girls, priest talked to boys, nuns to girls, and naturally, I had to sit in the wrong one. Priest tells a bunch of 13-15 year olds it's a sin to think about girls.

Yeah, now there's sex ed for ya. A room full of raging hormones and the advice given is a guilt trip.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Tue, 02-07-2012 - 4:26pm

I attended 12 years of Catholic school, Yea, my image of sex ed was a priest teaching it to our entire class, 8th grade boys AND girls!

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 05-03-2011
Tue, 02-07-2012 - 4:28pm
That was me who said that.

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