Sad..and interesting.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-15-2008
Sad..and interesting.
15
Wed, 08-25-2010 - 3:10pm
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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-10-2010
Wed, 08-25-2010 - 3:34pm
I believe it. I think some of the problems we're having in this country relate to people just plain not knowing or misunderstanding things.

~OPAL~

~OPAL~   onoz_omg2.gif OMG ONOZ image by KILLER_BOB11694

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-22-2000
Wed, 08-25-2010 - 3:53pm

I agree.


Starting to curb that fact could begin by requiring that citizens who vote pass a test to determine who has a minimal level of understanding of current affairs, politics, and history.


Care to join with me in this crusade to minimize the effect of people simply not knowing or misunderstanding things?


Sonny

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-10-2010
Wed, 08-25-2010 - 4:18pm
Yes...but we shouldn't call it a "crusade," if you know what I mean. I'd like to know what is going on in our schools that people simply aren't aware/don't know really basic things. I went to Catholic schools, and am grateful for the opportunity, because I think our public schools are failing. I homeschooled my own sons in their middle school years, and I have to say, that when they returned to public high school, they were ahead of the game. It made high school a breeze for them, but it pointed to how inadequate the schools have become. Part of it relates to the curriculum itself, and that we CAN change. As far as encouraging curiosity and desire to learn, I that that will be a major challenge.

~OPAL~

~OPAL~   onoz_omg2.gif OMG ONOZ image by KILLER_BOB11694

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-22-2000
Wed, 08-25-2010 - 4:39pm

You may never find me more strongly in agreement with any single post from you than I am on this one.


How did we get this way? Public schools are failing us, and our kids. Amen.


I salute your way of addressing it in raising and rearing your kids. I must ask, didnt you want to do something to better their HS experience? Make it more challenging? Just interested in what your reasons were for having them stay there.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-28-2009
Wed, 08-25-2010 - 4:40pm
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iVillage Member
Registered: 10-28-2009
Wed, 08-25-2010 - 4:51pm

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I don't think this is the problem of the schools. I got a fine education in public schools, yet people I went to school with think they didn't get a good education. I remember clearly my government class in high school. It was fun, it was interesting, and it was an election year (1984) so everything we did was tied into what was actually happening as it occurred. I think I was the only one in the class who enjoyed it. The rest of the class thought it was "boring." Well, when one doesn't apply themselves not much is going to stick. Another thing that I think helped spark my interest was the fact that my parents watched the news every night and read the newspaper every morning and politics were discussed. My grandmother had been very up on what was happening in politics as well, so I knew what was going on from a young age and how important it was to be as informed as possible.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-10-2010
Wed, 08-25-2010 - 5:05pm

We have a wonderful high school locally, and I wanted them to have that terrific experience. My boys' decisions in high school (in terms of taking honors and AP classes) was their own. My older son was more interested in sports and girls, and I think he wouldn't have been one to have the attitude necessary to take AP classes. My younger son wanted to attend public high school, because he wanted to be able to avail himself of our half-day technical high school. It was his pathway. He did make National (Vocational-) Technical Honor Society as well as National Honor Society. His weighted gpa was 4.75 and was heavy in math including calculus.

Our middle school was an different matter altogether. At the time, I wouldn't have wanted anybody's child to have to go there. It is much better now, but back in the '90's when my sons would have attended, it was a cesspool with violence, disrespect and low test scores.

~OPAL~

~OPAL~   onoz_omg2.gif OMG ONOZ image by KILLER_BOB11694

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-10-2010
Wed, 08-25-2010 - 5:12pm
My parents had two newspapers delivered to our house also. One thing that I think actually did help us was that we didn't have a television in our house until 1967. We could visit my aunt or grandfather to watch television, but there wasn't one at home. Reading and listening to the radio was as good as it got in terms of entertainment. We also had family dinners every evening. I think that it helps when a bunch of people sit around the table and discuss their days and the events of the world. Dinner (which we called "supper") would last over an hour, and my mom always had some comment or question about what was on the news. That would spark some noisy exchanges. I don't know if families do that much anymore. My boys were really busy, and my husband traveled extensively, so a relaxed and long dinner together was a rarity in our house.

~OPAL~

~OPAL~   onoz_omg2.gif OMG ONOZ image by KILLER_BOB11694

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2010
Wed, 08-25-2010 - 5:23pm
But wouldn't that create another layer of beaurocracy? Surely, we'd need to start a govt agency or dept to create the test, administer it etc. LOL, can't believe anyone fiscally conservative would be advocating that . . ..

“Clearly," said Arthur,"you're an idiot- but you're our kind of idiot. Come on.” 
― Markus ZusakThe Book Thief

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-22-2000
Wed, 08-25-2010 - 6:18pm

Nope. No new layers. I envision something like our kids do to get their learner's permit to drive...only this one will not be administered at the DMV, but at the voting precinct....computer teminal, after the poll worker checks you in, you head to the computer. You are asked 20 basic questions. If you miss some predetermined number of questions, the screen goes blank and you are not allowed to vote in this election.

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