Should illegal immigrants get discounted tuition?

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-18-2008
Should illegal immigrants get discounted tuition?
119
Mon, 04-09-2012 - 3:57pm

Colorado says yes...

http://www.9news.com/rss/story.aspx?storyid=261879

DENVER (AP) - Senate Democrats approved legislation that would allow illegal immigrants in Colorado attend college at a discounted tuition rate.

The bill passed on a party-line vote Monday with Republican opposition. The bill heads to the Republican-controlled House.

The proposal would let illegal immigrants who graduate from Colorado high schools attend college at a rate lower than the out-of-state price, but slightly higher than the in-state rate.

The students must sign an affidavit saying they are seeking legal status.

It would be up to colleges whether to participate in the tuition program.

Supporters say illegal immigrants who grew up attending state schools deserve a chance to attend college at an affordable rate. But opponents say the bill rewards illegal behavior.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-03-2011
Mon, 04-09-2012 - 4:00pm
I don't have a problem with it. They are, in fact, residents of that state.
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-16-2005
Mon, 04-09-2012 - 4:43pm
If they are illegal then they are not legal residents of the state. It is a blow to all immigrants and residents that are here legally. My guess is that it won't pass the next vote.


iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2006
Mon, 04-09-2012 - 5:44pm

It's similar to Texas' law that allows in state tuition for those students.,..,the one Gov. Perry got in hot water over when he said some "didn't have a heart" when they attacked this bill, a position which he backtracked on later for political reasons.

Avatar for xxxs
Community Leader
Registered: 01-25-2010
Mon, 04-09-2012 - 10:50pm

If you are in the US illegally that individual has their "home" country as the residence.

chaika

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2006
Tue, 04-10-2012 - 12:20am
"Your state won't be effected because the Illegal alien will have been repatriated to their native country."

So you are fine with "repatriating" kids to places where they don't know anyone and don't speak the language? Cool.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Tue, 04-10-2012 - 7:30am
A child that is brought here as an infant or two year old has no "native country" other than this one. It is a vexed issue because you don't want to encourage people to bring in little kids illegally, but once they are here, have gone through our schools, and are in their way to being productive members of society, it seems cruel to deny them the financial aid for which any other student would be eligible.
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-03-2011
Tue, 04-10-2012 - 9:36am
This subject seriously makes me pissed. It's mind boggling the number of people who have no problem with punishing children for the misdemeanor laws that their parents break. This is the United States of America...we aren't supposed to make children receive the penalty for the crimes of their parents. It's sickening, immoral, and disgusting.
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-16-2005
Tue, 04-10-2012 - 9:54am
If I don't legally reside in a state my children would not be granted in state tuition. It's fine that that would pay out of state for you, but those parents that did break the law get a break.


iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Tue, 04-10-2012 - 10:22am
I think we either need to say that parents have to prove they are here legally in order to enroll their kids in public school at all, or we need to extend the right to attend public colleges to all state residents, legal or not. It just seems cruel to tell a kid who has gone through the public school system, maybe even excelled there, that they are not eligible for aid/in-state tuition rates because of a choice their parents made fifteen years or so ago.
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-03-2011
Tue, 04-10-2012 - 10:39am
This is for North Carolina. I don't see anything there about one's parents. If a student goes to high school in North Carolina, that is enough to prove residency.

http://www.ncsu.edu/grad/tuition-residency/

Basic Requirements of Legal Residency

• establishment of domicile (legal residence) and physical presence in North Carolina for at least 12 months
• residence has been maintained for at least 12 continuous months prior to the start of the term
• intent to make North Carolina a permanent home of indefinite duration
• evidence supporting that one is not in the state solely for the purpose of attending an institution of higher education

Here are the requirements for Nevada...again, nothing about the parents.

Qualifying for Nevada Residency
Residency regulations have been established by the Board of Regents. For a complete listing of categories and definitions, please refer to the Undergraduate Catalog.

The following categories qualify for Nevada resident status:

A member of the Armed Forces of the United States
Full-time licensed personnel employed by a public school district in Nevada
A teacher who is currently employed full time in Nevada
A professional or classified employee of the University and Community College System of Nevada
Company relocation (also applies to spouse and children)
Family relocation to the state
Millennium scholarship recipients
A student who has lived in the state for a period of 12 months
http://web.unlv.edu/admissions/residency.html

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