Is the Tea Party Canada bound?

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-29-2003
Is the Tea Party Canada bound?
45
Mon, 08-30-2010 - 7:30pm

Lurker here. I just came across this and thought it was post worthy.

http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Politics/2010/08/30/15188571.html

OTTAWA - Are Canadians getting fed up with government regulations, rules and taxes? The man behind an attempt to start a Tea Party movement in Canada hopes so.

This past weekend hundreds of thousands of Americans flocked to Washington for a rally about taking back their country. They came to hear speakers such as Glenn Beck and Sarah Palin, and although not explicitly a Tea Party event, the crowd drew many from the movement that calls for government to get government off the backs of hard working people.

Andrew Lawton wants to bring that spirit to Canada.

Lawton, a conservative-leaning activist from London, Ont., is one of the organizers behind an online attempt to start a Tea Party movement in Canada.

Starting with a Facebook group, Lawton says there are plans for rallies this fall in Ottawa and Quebec City. Other cities may be added.

There are differences between the two countries Lawton acknowledges but adds the basis of the movement is the same.

“The issues differ but the ideology stays the same. Advocating for smaller government, freedom and letting people live their own lives.”

“One person came up to me recently and said that freedom is an American value,” said Lawton. “That’s not true. It’s an attitude I want to change.”

Veteran radio broadcaster Charles Adler has worked on both sides of the border and has spent the last several years taking the pulse of the nation as host of a cross-Canada talk radio show.

Adler says a Tea Party movement in Canada only has a shot of working in this country if it is more moderate than the American version.

“Is there some comparison in terms of resentment of elite opinion and big government? It's out there,” Adler told QMI Agency. “But will it get the enthusiasm and funding that the U.S. Tea Party has gotten? Doubtful.”

Dr. Brian Lee Crowley, managing director of the McDonald-Laurier Institute, an Ottawa-based think-tank, also gives the movement little chance of success.

Crowley says the impact of the Reform Party in Canada in the 1990s is still being felt in Canadian politics. Due to Reform, he says, Canadians don’t easily accept higher taxes.

“I think we’ve certainly changed the political culture quite a bit,” said Crowley. “Even the NDP campaigns now on no-tax increases or even some tax reduction. That’s a huge sea change from where we were several decades ago.”

On the West Coast, former B.C. Premier Bill Vander Zalm believes there is an appetite for change. Vander Zalm has spent the last few months leading the campaign against the HST.

“Maybe we’re seeing the beginnings of that right here,” said Vander Zalm. “When we started this whole campaign against the HST, it was just the HST. Now it has grown into a whole issue of democracy, people are saying that we don’t have democracy, we elect dictatorships.”

That’s exactly the type of sentiment that Lawton is hoping to tap into.

“It’s getting to the point now that there is enough Canadians who are saying, 'We’ve had enough.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-10-2010
Mon, 08-30-2010 - 7:38pm
That would be interesting if it happened. I didn't think that Canadians were all that conservative or were all that unhappy with their government. Do radio and television personalities take strong political partisan stances and hammer home the message? Are there well-funded (faux grassroots) astroturf groups and think tanks promoting this idea? I don't blame people for not wanting to pay taxes, but it takes a good deal of hard work frothing up sufficient anger and resentment to get a major movement going.

~OPAL~

~OPAL~   onoz_omg2.gif OMG ONOZ image by KILLER_BOB11694

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-14-2010
Mon, 08-30-2010 - 9:22pm

We can only hope so. I know a few Canadians that have fled the country and refuse to return because the socialism there refuses to reward hard work and personal ingenuity.


iVillage Member
Registered: 08-16-2005
Tue, 08-31-2010 - 5:42am
The Canadians I know personally would love to join...These are a few friends and coworkers, but I have rarely seen a Canadian on IV that is any type of conservative.





iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2006
Tue, 08-31-2010 - 9:08am

I buy Canadian made items all the time...can't find much Made In USA. I guess the manufacturer's are doing it for the sheer mad fun of it, as the socialism "refuses to reward hard work and personal ingenuity".

Deborah

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-29-2003
Tue, 08-31-2010 - 1:52pm

but I have rarely seen a Canadian on IV that is any type of conservative


I think that might be because most Canadians aren't outspoken about their party until it's election time (my friends are all like that).

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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-16-2005
Tue, 08-31-2010 - 2:06pm
I apologize for the statement.


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-29-2003
Tue, 08-31-2010 - 2:39pm

Thanks for the reply :)


I think that your average Canadian conservative is closer to centre than

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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-14-2010
Tue, 08-31-2010 - 3:41pm

"I buy Canadian made items all the time..."


Buy a lot of oil and lumber do you? Those are their two biggest industries. After that comes their metal industry exports: gold, uranium, lead, so I suppose you may be stocking up on bars of those or something.


But seeing as how the topic has come up, do you happen to notice a pattern as to how Canada's economy is getting funded? Possibly through exploitation of natural resources we're not allowed to do in the US anymore and then shipping us those resources?


That type of economy is what the Middle East is based on. When they finish selling off their natural resources, their true poverty will begin to show.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2009
Tue, 08-31-2010 - 7:15pm

Will not happen.

We will throw Harper out of power first.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2006
Tue, 08-31-2010 - 8:04pm

"Buy a lot of oil and lumber do you? Those are their two biggest industries. After that comes their metal industry exports: gold, uranium, lead, so I suppose you may be stocking up on bars of those or something"

If you're suggesting I make stuff up, you need to pick another victim...and get your truth-o-meter adjusted first. It could save a lot of embarrassment.

I'm not a manufacturer myself so I don't need raw materials, and I'm not paranoid, so I don't need anything to stuff into my mattress. I buy "value added" stuff. I've purchased tools, items for my musical instruments (both the Kun and Mach 1 shoulder rests for violin and viola, of which I have several in different sizes), agricultural products (including hemp seeds, which US farmers are apparently not allowed to grow), etc.

I give precedence to origins when buying goods in this order: my area, US overall, Canada, western Europe, then...other. I expect to be paid a living wage, and I expect to buy goods and services from people who make a living wage. The Mach 1 costs $50-$60...I could get a cheap knock off for a lot less. It turns out (surprise, surprise!!!) that you get what you pay for. I'd rather have a few high quality items than a bunch of junk.

"Possibly through exploitation of natural resources we're not allowed to do in the US anymore and then shipping us those resources?"

Environmental exploitation is alive and well in the US. I live in Texas...where the "waste" gas from oil wells is flared off by the bezillions of gallons because it "is not economical" to capture it, even though the geologist who thought that there was basically an endless source of petroleum because it arose naturally deep in the earth was debunked years ago. I lived for a decade in Maine, with its endless logging trucks, with its mountaintops eroded from clearcutting. I've flown over the Appalachians, with its mountaintops *missing* because of strip mining. And I live a hundred miles from a town where people get eye infections from the toxic sludge brought by the "poo poo choo choo" and spread on ranchland because New Yorkers didn't want to deal with their own waste.

That type of economy is what the Middle East is based on. When they finish selling off their natural resources, their true poverty will begin to show."

Pardon...your assumptions are showing. Canada exports many value added products. But...ahem...the US is on that path...we've exported our manufacturing to people who wouldn't be able to survive on that wage in the US. I think it's been justified under the guise of "capitalism".

Deborah

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