Thoughts on Paul Ryan?

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anonymous user
Registered: 12-31-1969
Thoughts on Paul Ryan?
254
Mon, 08-13-2012 - 9:54am

I'm kind of new to iVillage, so I hope I'm posting in the right place!

I was just wondering what you think about Romney's VP choice.  I don't know a lot about Paul Ryan, so I don't have much of an opinion yet. 

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Avatar for xxxs
Community Leader
Registered: 01-25-2010
Mon, 08-20-2012 - 3:06pm

While many do think that they can make more money in the stock there is a substantial risk.  What safeguards will be in place if that does occur? The devil will be in the details which the public really needs to read and discuss before any election.  One reform IMO is to require the conventions 6 months before an election.  All of the plank to be explained in 7th grade English.  No legalese.

dragowoman

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-21-2006
Mon, 08-20-2012 - 2:47pm

I know this is a very unpopular plan with many, but I am in favor of privatizing Medicare and Social Security for those who want the option.. I have heard, since I was a young girl, that by the time I reach eligibility age, the funds will be depleted and that seems to be our reality. I am pretty sure that I could have taken the money that I donated into Social Security and paid in Medicare taxes, invested it and come out much better off than the return I will see from the government, had I been given the option.

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Avatar for xxxs
Community Leader
Registered: 01-25-2010
Mon, 08-20-2012 - 1:59pm

Yes, we can afford great health care.  However,it will mean that the current thinking must be revised.   To deal with the problems taxes will have to be raised, fraud in all aspects will have to be attacked more medical personnel will need to be trained.  The cost of training will have to be lowered. 

  I agree that "cutting costs" is not truly viable as that reduces the supply of medical/dental treatment.  We the people must get used to more taxes.  However,the tax laws need revision.  No one ever wants to pay taxes.  While the ACA as it was written did have negative effects.  It is a step in the right direction. 

  One of the problem is that too many of those in congress make too much money to understand the plight of the avg. or below income citizen.  More companies do not offer benefits as they once did.  Our society works to many cross purposes.  As an example: fuel economy standards.

  Higher fuel economy standard have meant that the taxes for the roads are dwindling.  Many states see the fund shrinking.  So they raise license fees and othe taxes to make up what was lost. 

Yes our government and many citizens are truly short sighted.  The citizen is knocked piller to post as congress cannot seem to be strong enough to plan effectively.  Phasing out of some of the deductions would help too.

dragowoman

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-03-2009
Mon, 08-20-2012 - 1:04pm
There are certainly seniors who struggle to make ends meet. But many also have decent, sometimes even very generous, pensions. Their group net worth is something like 47 times that of young adults. http://news.yahoo.com/us-wealth-gap-between-young-old-widest-ever-050259922.html

I don't buy the litigation angle. My father's health has been failing for the past half dozen years. He's ninety. Not to be brutal about it, but old age is terminal. Most recently, he went in to the family practice physician who coordinates his health and had a checkup. After that checkup, the physician sent him to a specialized testing service for more evaluation. Asked my father why. He didn't know AND HE DIDN'T ASK. But you could bet a huge chunk of money that he would have had he been footing the bill.

Medicare Advantage has turned out to be a financial boondoggle. "Under Medicare Advantage, the Kaiser Family Foundation says, Medicare ends up paying the private plans MORE per enrollee -- about 7% more -- than the fee-for-service program does". http://firstread.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/08/16/13320149-medicare-advantage-vs-the-romney-ryan-plan?lite

As for raising the income cut-off level, such a move does make sense but you watch--no such thing will happen. Politicians don't want to lose the votes they can count on from a group well-known to turn out en masse.

Jabberwocka

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-08-2006
Mon, 08-20-2012 - 11:32am
Why is it a scary thought? If you fragment a system it isn't very efficient in costs or delivery. Do you have a better option?

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-21-2006
Mon, 08-20-2012 - 11:14am

Talk about going from the frying pan into the fire for seniors..............that's a really scary thought.......

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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-08-2006
Mon, 08-20-2012 - 10:31am
It is unfortunate that are health system is set in such a way that only those who can afford it will get treatment which leaves many vulnerable. Perhaps, it will become apparent turning Medicare into a single payer system is the only viable way to go.

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-21-2006
Mon, 08-20-2012 - 10:28am

Unfortunately, it will happen and is happening. I have an old high school friend who works for one of the huge healthcare organizations in our area on the administration side of the organization, not patient care. She was over the other night and was telling me that 12 of their facilities (they own nursing homes, hospitals, quick care clinics and some doctor offices) are in the first stages of bankruptcy due to cuts and new regulation costs imposed by the ACA. We were not having a political discussion and I have no idea what her political views are, she was relating to me how stressful her job is because of higher costs of compliance and lower reimbursements imposed by the ACA. She commented that they are going to have to start closing facilities and that is very stressful to her from the human aspect of her job, but from the business aspect, it's the only thing they can do.

We are being short sighted if we think hospitals, nursing homes, clinics and physician offices can continue to stay in business when absorbing higher costs and less revenue. That type of business plan makes no sense. Doctors will have to make choices and may be unable to participate in Medicare, if doing so results in a profit margin loss, even though they  hate turning those patients away. For several years I managed the labs of a group of physicians, who specialized in rheumatology and arthritis. We saw a large amount of Medicare patients, as you would imagine. The Medicare reimbursement for some lab tests was less than it cost me to run the test, so we had to quit running them "in house" for those patients and had to start sending the patients to the local hospital to have them done. I hated making that decision, because it was very inconvenient for the patients, many of them depended on others for transportation and compliance became an issue, as often, they didn't/couldn't get it done. It affected every aspect of their care in our office, because, no lab results, often meant that a proper diagnosis could not be made or medications could not be refilled. The cost of medical care has gone up since I "retired", so if reimbursements to physicians are slashed, their choices will be limited, because whether we like it or not, they need to produce revenue to stay in business and for most of them making a profit is important. 

I am in the camp that we do need to overhaul Medicare and other programs because we don't have the money to pay for them, but we also need to be honest about it. If reimbursements to health care facilities are cut, benefits will be reduced.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-21-2006
Mon, 08-20-2012 - 7:37am

Of course, the Obama administration isn't going to advertise that benefits will be cut to seniors because that would not go over well. However, reimbursement fees are where many of the cuts will be made. Since a business can not run without sufficient revenue, when it becomes a financial liability for a healthcare facility to treat those on Medicare, they will have to discontinue treatment. When I was still working in the field of healthcare, there were several lab tests that we couldn't/wouldn't perform on Medicare patients because the reimbursement was less than the cost of the test. It sounds harsh, but we could not have stayed in business if we lost money on lab tests we performed. Sadly, the reimbursement for Medicaid didn't come close to covering the costs of treating those patients, so we quit seeing them altogether. I see this happening with Medicare patients under Obama's plan.

My MIL is on Medicare and she carries a supplemental insurance policy because Medicare already doesn't cover all the costs of her care.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-08-2006
Mon, 08-20-2012 - 12:05am
Sorry, I meant to type reimbursement.

 

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