To Tip or Not to Tip

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2007
To Tip or Not to Tip
54
Mon, 08-02-2010 - 8:01pm

Noticed someone mentioned tipping in another thread and it got me thinking:


Oprah was boycotted by many for suggesting that in these tough times, reducing the standard tip to 10% was okay.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-10-2010
Mon, 08-02-2010 - 8:22pm
Considering that many restaurant owners pay only the minimum hourly waitstaff wage of $2.13/hour, I feel compelled to give a minimum of 10% (for somewhat lousy service) to 20% for great service. I had a minimum wage job at our college snack bar one year, so I can empathize with restaurant workers. I understand what you're saying about how delivering a hamburger to one's table requires no more effort than delivering a steak. Still, I'm sticking with the 10 to 20 percent guideline. I think that restaurant workers are just as deserving of eeking by as anybody else.

~OPAL~

~OPAL~   onoz_omg2.gif OMG ONOZ image by KILLER_BOB11694

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-12-2008
Mon, 08-02-2010 - 8:23pm

It honestly depends on service. If I have crappy service I'm not going to tip as well as if I have good service. I understand that everyone has good-days/bad days, and that can affect service, but if your day has been so bad that you give me crappy service, maybe you shouldn't be at work. KWIM?

Now for tipping the mail man and like at Christmas, sorry not going to happen!

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-12-2008
Mon, 08-02-2010 - 8:25pm
Actually it all depends on the state. In WA, when I lived there, wait staff maid at least minimum wage. So when they go their tips they were averaging at least 19 and hour. Almost what I was making in a professional trained job.
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iVillage Member
Registered: 07-15-2010
Mon, 08-02-2010 - 8:40pm

FTR: my comment regarding tipping well wasn't really speaking about at restaurants. There I will tip depending on the service.

My tip comments were concerning things like tipping my building contractor and his workers, the people who delivered a shed, installed a mirror, built a fence, did landscaping, put on a roof, sold me insurance, cut my hair, my painter and his crew, my tile guy, plumber, AC man, electrician, furniture movers, appliance deliverers, heck...I even sent money to the lady who accidentally hit my son's car in the parking lot where he worked (not that I'd call that a tip--more like a token of appreciation). Anyone who goes above and beyond to provide quality service...anyone who's taken care of my multiple times.

At restaurants though even with abysmal service the minimum I'd leave is 10%. And I'd follow it up with a letter to the management. And for exceptional service I might leave 25% or 30% and follow that up with a letter of appreciation as well.

>>A successful economy depends on the proliferation of the rich, on creating a large class of risk taking men who are willing to shun the easy channels of a comfortable life in order to create new enterprise, win huge profits, and invest them again. – George Franklin Gilder<<
>>Luck is what you call it when preparation meets opportunity<<
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-10-2010
Mon, 08-02-2010 - 8:51pm
Wow...not around here for your average Olive Garden or Applebees. It is optional for restaurants to pay their waitstaff more than the absolute minimum. My son's wife used to work at a popular local restaurant (only on Friday and Saturday evenings) where people would spend a minor fortune on drinks and drive up their bill. She could easily make $200 to $300 per evening on tips. She had a short "gig" helping out a friend working at National Harbor (Gaylord Hotel) where she lucked into a couple of shifts where she earned over $400 in tips. So, yes, it can be done.

~OPAL~

~OPAL~   onoz_omg2.gif OMG ONOZ image by KILLER_BOB11694

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-12-2008
Mon, 08-02-2010 - 8:56pm
My brother used to wait at a restaurant outside of Pittsburgh. He told me easily on a Friday Saturday night he would bring home 500 bucks, but when he worked day shift, he was hurting. He is now a chef, and doesn't make as much as when he was waiting. But loves this job so much more.
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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-10-2010
Mon, 08-02-2010 - 9:17pm
I always thought that the chef made a decent salary. It doesn't make sense that the chef would make less than the servers.

~OPAL~

~OPAL~   onoz_omg2.gif OMG ONOZ image by KILLER_BOB11694

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-30-2010
Mon, 08-02-2010 - 9:44pm

The chef does not rely on tips to supplement the income. Some restaurants may share a % of the tips with the chef but those are few and far between. I'm not sure if you quoted the whole info on the $2.13 post, if so I apologize for reposting it...


"If so, your employer is only required to pay $2.13 an hour in direct wages if that amount plus the tips received equals at least the federal minimum wage of $7,25 per hour. Your employer can only do that if you are informed about the tip credit allowance, if your employer is able to show that you earn at least the minimum wage when direct wage and tip are combined and allows you to retain all tips. In a lot of states your employer is allowed to install a valid tip pooling arrangement in which all employees participate. When your job is a combined tipped and a non-tipped profession, the tip credit is always only for the hours spent in the tipped occupation."

Liberal
Liberal
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-30-2010
Mon, 08-02-2010 - 9:47pm

oops forgot the chart and link:


http://www.paywizard.org/main/Minimumwageandovertime/MinimumWageTIPRecevers


2010 Minimum Wage Tip Receivers per Jurisdiction



Jurisdiction

Basic

Liberal
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-12-2008
Mon, 08-02-2010 - 10:36pm
My brother explained it to me once. He said something about it being about the money in the front, and passion in the back. (Kind of like a mullet. LOL) When he was an executive chef working in the keys, he was making good money. But depending on what position as a chef you hold it makes a difference.
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