Walmart Workers Collect Food for Other Workers?

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-15-2009
Walmart Workers Collect Food for Other Workers?
38
Wed, 11-20-2013 - 7:58pm

I know this is a bit off topic, and not necessarily a political topic, but I thought it was worth sharing.

A Walmart store decided to do a food drive for its own employees who are unable to afford a Thanksgiving dinner:  http://www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2013/11/is_walmarts_request_of_associa.html

Everyone knows that Walmart is infamous for its low prices and wages.  Is Walmart admitting that they realize their workers are underpaid?  Instead of raising wages, they take up a food drive?

What do you think about the store's food drive?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-08-2006
Thu, 12-26-2013 - 12:49am

Really?  More people work service related jobs because they pay so well???

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-17-2012
Thu, 12-12-2013 - 10:40pm

The facts are that WalMart provides millions of jobs, pays a competitive wage and offers communities quality goods at cheap prices.... not to mention the huge amount of good work WalMart does via social programs and charities.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-03-2009
Thu, 12-12-2013 - 10:12pm

To JBB Good grief. You will believe what you want to believe, facts be damned. NWMT.

Jabberwocka

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001

deenasdad wrote:
<p><strong> Walmart is NOT a responsible employer</strong></p><p><strong><br /></strong>Back in the day, if you frequented a McDonald's you'd find it being run by teenagers and 20-somethings who were just starting out in the job market working at entry level jobs.  Now that liberal fools keep raising the minimum wage, you find 30-somethings making a career out of cooking fries and cheeseburgers while our teenagers and 20-somethings can't find a job.  There are always negative unintended consequences when liberals inflict their ideology on society.</p><p>WalMart should raise it wages, they cry... but then you lose all those entry level jobs... you destroy the initiative to gain experience and move to other, higher paying jobs... and you force WalMart to raise it's prices which hurts all of it's patrons, especially the poor.  Why do liberals want to hurt young people and the poor?</p>

Good post, And you gotta wonder what workers that are working there + two other jobs + going to school and raising two kids think of the stupid liberal pushovers...  My bet is they are grateful they have a job, My bet they are grateful Walmart gives to charity.  I really have a new appreciation for Walmart!

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-17-2012
Wed, 12-11-2013 - 11:22pm

WalMart pays it's employees a fair-market wage.  In fact, when it opened it's two new Wash. D.C. stores, there were 23,000 applications for the 600 available jobs.  I wonder why so many people would rush to work for such an oppressive, heartless company that paid unlivable wages.  People who keep pushing the ambiguous, and ridiculous, "living wage" don't have a clue about economics or the damage their liberal silliness does to the country.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-17-2012
Wed, 12-11-2013 - 11:20pm

Walmart is NOT a responsible employer


Back in the day, if you frequented a McDonald's you'd find it being run by teenagers and 20-somethings who were just starting out in the job market working at entry level jobs.  Now that liberal fools keep raising the minimum wage, you find 30-somethings making a career out of cooking fries and cheeseburgers while our teenagers and 20-somethings can't find a job.  There are always negative unintended consequences when liberals inflict their ideology on society.

WalMart should raise it wages, they cry... but then you lose all those entry level jobs... you destroy the initiative to gain experience and move to other, higher paying jobs... and you force WalMart to raise it's prices which hurts all of it's patrons, especially the poor.  Why do liberals want to hurt young people and the poor?

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-17-2012
Wed, 12-11-2013 - 11:03pm

I say that as wife of a prosperous business owner.

And how much does your husband pay his employees?  I'd be willing to bet he pays them a "competitive market wage," based on skill and experience, rather than someone else's idea of what he should be paying them.  Imagine that.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-17-2012
Wed, 12-11-2013 - 10:53pm

Oh, and WalMart is consistently in the top three... usually #1... of the most charitable companies.  In 2012, WalMart gave more than a BILLION dollars to charities.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-03-2009

To JBB:  I have posted links which show that Walmart and McDonalds both have inordinately large numbers of food stamp recipients in their employee ranks.  YES, other corporations do pay their employees enough that they can avoid public assistance programs for all but catastrophic events.  Divorcing individuals from the companies for which they work makes no sense whatsoever.  

Asking what constitutes a fair wage probably does make some sense since costs of living can vary dramatically.  But food stamp recipients have to prove need:  http://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/eligibility  Ergo, if a person is working full time (and there's another area of controversy since some corporations manage to JUST keep employee hours below the accepted standard so they don't have to pay benefits or overtime) and that person is on food stamps, the LOGICAL question would be why?  

Also the ratio between full time employment uppermost and lowermost salary levels would be a way to get some sense of, for lack of a better word, fairness.  J.C. Penney had the worst ratio in the S&P 500 Index top 250 as you can see by going to this site where Walmart came in at #18  http://go.bloomberg.com/multimedia/ceo-pay-ratio/  There were some eye-opening names (at least for me) in the list.  But I was also interested in seeing what the average worker pay and benefits figure was.  I don't entirely trust Bloomberg's methodology since it relied heavily on assumptions and derivative computations:  

Because most companies don't disclose average worker pay, the CEO compensation was divided by an estimate of industry-specific rank-and-file employee compensation calculated from government data. The methodologyis based on one developed by the nonprofit Economic Policy Institute for a 2012 study that focused on aggregate trends, not company-specific findings.

Workers' salaries for 2011 and 2012 were determined from the Bureau of Labor Statistics' database of average hourly pay for production and nonsupervisory employees by industry, which is based on the agency's Current Employment Statistics survey.

Those totals were increased by industry-specific multipliers reflecting workers' benefits, based on the Bureau of Economic Analysis's National Income and Products database. BEA totals for each industry's spending on wages and benefits were divided by its wages-only sums to produce the multipliers. The latest BEA figures were for 2011, so three-year average multipliers were used for 2012.

Companies' industries were determined by the proprietary Bloomberg Industry Classification System, which is based on the firms' revenue sources. Each company's BICS industry was matched with the closest corresponding sector under the North American Industry Classification System, which the government agencies use. In a handful of instances where there was no exact match, data for parent industries were used instead.

Walmart, according to Bloomberg, isn't the most egregious pay-gap offender.  I cannot explain why Walmart seems to get more than its fair share of media criticism--maybe because of its huge size and global reach.  But the gap does matter in a stable and democratic society.  When there is no healthy and substantial middle class,  a struggling lower class and and influential but small upper class, you've got all the ingredients for revolution.  

Look this all over.  Read the links.  Read up on the risk factors for income/wealth gap.  Makes for more intelligent debate.  Mouthing the talking points of ideologues is no substitute for critical thinking.  

Jabberwocka

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-03-2009
Mon, 12-09-2013 - 10:51am

To PSS: Do show me where I have disparaged individuals who chose to help others, regardless of their income level. Do show me where I have ever said that "X amount of money" would be a qualifying level for philanthropy. My point, made over and over again but seemingly without much attention being paid by others, is that Walmart does not pay its employees well enough to keep them, in large numbers, off the public assistance rolls; and "encouraging" those same underpaid employees, in a store sponsored campaign, to help each other out when Walmart management and ownership are rolling in dough but don't "help out" by paying a living wage, is morally bankrupt and intellectually suspect. Creating a strawman under the guise of it being what "some people" believe and then criticizing that stance is sad. Stick to facts and logic. They serve to convince much better than fabrication or innuendo.

Jabberwocka

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