Without debate or criticism..Can someone

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-19-2004
Without debate or criticism..Can someone
3
Tue, 10-26-2004 - 12:40pm
tell me when this country was separated by two parties? You know the Constitution is built on the pride of democracy. When or were there always two sides of politics?! I thought this board could educate me on this. Thanks!
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Tue, 10-26-2004 - 1:03pm

Read "A National Party No More" by Zell Miller.

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-20-2003
Tue, 10-26-2004 - 1:09pm
I agree that the 2 party system rose up during Adams presidency -- I just finished his biography and it is wonderful - highly, highly recommended. Adams was staunchly anti-party - his belief was that parties naturally distorted a leaders priorities from country-first to party-first. He was proven right, I guess, because he didn't play the party game at all, didn't court favor with the members, and was undercut dramatically by his 'own' party ( a membership he didn't claim, but was seen as being a Federalist). Jefferson went on to win the presidency. (In an interesting parallel to today, Adams' son learned from his father to play the game very, very well and strongly affiliated himself with party leaders, going on to win the Presidency a few terms later).

W

Lilypie Baby Days



Lilypie Baby Days
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Tue, 10-26-2004 - 3:36pm
Wow, I was just reading up on this myself for a book I'm about to start.

While it wasn't originally designed to be this way, it seems that one of the items sustaining the two party system is the presence of the electoral college. States in general (all but 2) have an all or nothing approach to their electoral votes. Therefore to win enough EC votes to make a diffence, a third party must have the resources to sway a majority of people in several states. New political parties usually start up in one area of the country. If one state is won by a third party then it might effect the race enough to force a Congressional decision, but it's highly unlikely.

Third parties may have an influence on local or state politics as in the case of Minnesota (Governor Ventura was in the Reform Party) or in local independant runs (in Texas my ballot has more people running independantly than Democrats). However, it would take a Herculean effort and lots of money to establish a viable national third party.

anonymous