Indiana Senate passes bill putting religion in science class

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2011
Indiana Senate passes bill putting religion in science class
9
Wed, 02-01-2012 - 10:48am
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001

This is very interesting to me because this year and just recently my 8th grader came home to tell me there is no God.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2009

The Catholic Church accepts evolution. I was brought up Catholic, taught by nuns. And yes, I was taught science and taught it properly... no creationism.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001

My DD is 14 and she challenged the reasons behind God after listening to school tell her that our ancestors are monkeys! I was raised Catholic and attended Catholic schools too, I agree that we accept both the story of Genesis and Evolution but Genesis was the story I grew up believing. Our children are being raised Catholic but they attend public schools, I think her doubt was reasonable and it opened conversation about why religion is important to us...

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2011

Do you know if the teacher said the words 'there is no God' or did your child draw that conclusion?

The fact is, we cannot prove a) there is a God, b) there is no God, or c) there are or aren't gods and goddesses. For the record, I believe in life energy and connect a goddess interface. I cannot prove any of it, nor can any believer in God or any other deity, and no one who disbelieves can prove the opposite.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2011

Do you disagree our ancestral lineage connects with that of simians?

The most logical way of handling origins for a believer in God is to accept god created evolution.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-09-2001

Well, I hope, then, that the creation myths of a variety of world religions are then going to be taught Buddhist, Native American, Australian aboriginal, Pagan, etc. Not just the Christian version...but I sincerely doubt any version but the Christian one will be allowed. Just another way to pollute gov't with religion, IMO. :smileymad:


Blessings,

Gypsy

)O(



iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
And there doesn't have to be hard evidence to prove religion like science either, That's the difference... No, DD drew the conclusion that there was no god on her own, I seriously wanted her to talk to our priest about her doubts because I didn't know if we were explaining why we believed in religion the right way, But her feelings have sort of fallen by the wayside now.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001

Huh?? Pollute?? Religion isn't taught in public school, Should some worldly version be taught there IYO? I don't know, I know there was an idea tossed around about offering a bible course as an elective in public high schools but I don't know if that took off or not, I think that would be a terrific theory base class, Just my thoughts!

Finally, nobody can force religion onto anybody in a public setting. But likewise, Nobody can force my kid NOT to wear a crucifix around her neck, NOT to pray and you can't deny my kid the right to attend a mass or service at her church even if it interferes with a public school day.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 03-09-2001
jamblessedthree wrote:

Huh?? Pollute?? Religion isn't taught in public school, Should some worldly version be taught there IYO? I don't know, I know there was an idea tossed around about offering a bible course as an elective in public high schools but I don't know if that took off or not, I think that would be a terrific theory base class, Just my thoughts!

Finally, nobody can force religion onto anybody in a public setting. But likewise, Nobody can force my kid NOT to wear a crucifix around her neck, NOT to pray and you can't deny my kid the right to attend a mass or service at her church even if it interferes with a public school day.

Religion *is* taught in public schools *if* they include the Creation myth in a Science class. That is what I would protest about. Science is science. Religion is religion. One belongs in a public school. One does not.

An elective Bible course I'd have no problem with, but would prefer a World Religion course that covers all religious sacred texts, a survey type course, IOW. That would not be appropriate until late high school or college, I wouldn't think, though, due to maturity of students. To only offer one elective course in a single world religion is in actuality sponsoring that religion officially, sneaking it through the "back door," as it were. Wrong, wrong, wrong in a public school. I much prefer a World Religion class so students learn to respect the different faith paths, and recognize that religious freedom is for all in our country, to practice different religions without persecution and in safety, free of discrimination or bullying.

Prayer individually and privately is everyone's right. Even in a public school. :) A child can pray to Allah, to the Christian God, to the Goddess and God, to whomever they believe in. Definitely *not* right for a TEACHER or other SCHOOL STAFF person to LEAD prayer during the school day, however. That would be establishment of religion by the gov't.

And no one should forbid *my* kid to wear her Pentacle, either! ;) Or another child to wear a different religion's symbol. No persecution allowed. Or, if a school chooses a dress code policy that forbids *all* religious jewelry, along with other things, that's o.k. by me, too. As long as it's evenly applied to everyone, students, teachers and staff. That's all. And some schools *do* ban religious jewelry because of bullying issues. Depends on the school. They can restrict and regulate acceptable appropriate attire, even if not a uniform. And some public schools have been known to require uniforms to eliminate gang insignia or too revealing "slut" type attire on the girls, or guys' butts cracks & underwear hanging out with low slung pants. Shrug. As long as it's evenly applied to everyone, I don't see any problem at all, either way.

And, if you want to take your child out of school for special religious observance, that is fine, too. She can make up the lessons when she comes back, by getting the information from the teacher. The only thing I would object to is that the students staying in class are denied learning because somebody has gone missing for religious observance. The rest of the students should continue on with their lessons. The missing student can catch up. No biggie to me. I've pulled my daughter out for special ritual days such as Samhain as well as other special Sabbats. And she made up her school work. Muslim students and Jewish students can be excused as well. If too much school is missed, that may harm the child's progress, though. So for super intensive religious attendance, it might be more appropriate to send the child to a religious school where it's all easily incorporated. When I was a child I was sent to Catholic school. We went to Mass every single morning. Then we had our academic curriculum. Simple. Parent's choice. Often religious observance is scheduled in the evenings as well, so school does not have to be sacrificed, nor the religious practice.I remember going to Mass for Holy Days of Obligation when my dad got off work, picked us up and we went to the evening Mass. When I no longer went to a Catholic school, there was Sunday instruction before the children's Mass. And I didn't miss public school attendance at all. Should be the parent's responsibility to see that the child's academic education doesn't suffer just as it is their choice and responsibility as to religious observance and instruction.


Blessings,

Gypsy

)O(