35 hours in school vs. in daycare

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
35 hours in school vs. in daycare
188
Fri, 02-06-2009 - 2:03pm

I was trying to think why I've been having such a hard time with the idea of going to work full-time in the fall and yet I don't have any problem with my kids going to school for the same amount of time when they are school age. I know that we've asked the question a lot "Why is it okay to put them in school for 35 hours but not in daycare for 35 hours?"

My toddler doesn't understand WHY Mommy is gone. He doesn't appreciate the difference between Mommy going to work and Mommy just disappearing all day. A 5-year old does. I think that until they are old enough to truly understand the purpose and necessity of the separation, those 35 hours are going to be experienced very differently.

Discuss.

Photobucket

pregnancy calendar








Photobucket

Photobucket




Pages

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Fri, 02-06-2009 - 3:59pm

what are the teachers like at the MDO?

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-05-2000
Fri, 02-06-2009 - 4:24pm

And that's how it was explained. Dh and I went to work, the girls went to school/work, and Dylan went to dc. That's just the way it was. But we also had the "advantage" of having siblings that also went places that Dylan didn't.

Chris

The truth may be out there but lies are in your head. Terry Pratchett

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-08-2006
Fri, 02-06-2009 - 5:09pm

<>

that is not atypical for just about any child in dc....Mine had no issue being dropped off, but when it was time to go -- MAN, could they howl! I learned REALLY fast not to take it personally -- they just didn't want to interrupt whatever they had been doing. With my ds, I learned that I needed to stay and chat with the provider for about 5-10 min. and countdown for him to when we were going to leave (to this day I still use the countdown method with him!). Dd had no issues going back and forth.

eileen

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-08-2003
Fri, 02-06-2009 - 5:42pm

I'm not sure how to address this question. Adults sometimes have to do things that kids may or may not understand. But they still have to be done, and the best thing the parent can do is help the child adjust. If you act as if dropping them off at daycare is a tragedy, then they'll be more likely to take the same view. If you make the best of it and use its as an opportunity for them to grow and develop in ways apart from you (which is healthy, and inevitable), then they will be more likely to have a positive experience.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Fri, 02-06-2009 - 6:18pm

I was thinking the same thing.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Fri, 02-06-2009 - 8:03pm
I consider 18 months to be a very young child. And again, even if he has no sense of time, he does have a sense of when he hasn't seen me all day.
Photobucket

pregnancy calendar








Photobucket

Photobucket




iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Fri, 02-06-2009 - 8:09pm
So are people here actually saying that a 1-year-old understands and experiences separation in the same way as a 5-year-old? Because I still don't think they do. I think they experience it differently.
Photobucket

pregnancy calendar








Photobucket

Photobucket




iVillage Member
Registered: 05-14-2006
Fri, 02-06-2009 - 8:14pm
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Fri, 02-06-2009 - 8:18pm
Then why do I feel like everyone keeps telling me that there is no difference between a toddler being gone for 35 hours and a grade schooler being gone for 35 hours? Just because both are "used to it" doesn't mean that it affects them both the same way.
Photobucket

pregnancy calendar








Photobucket

Photobucket




iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Fri, 02-06-2009 - 8:53pm

I think "how it affects them" has more to do with the situation they are going into and the personality of the child than it does the age.

Pages