35 hours in school vs. in daycare

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
35 hours in school vs. in daycare
188
Fri, 02-06-2009 - 2:03pm

I was trying to think why I've been having such a hard time with the idea of going to work full-time in the fall and yet I don't have any problem with my kids going to school for the same amount of time when they are school age. I know that we've asked the question a lot "Why is it okay to put them in school for 35 hours but not in daycare for 35 hours?"

My toddler doesn't understand WHY Mommy is gone. He doesn't appreciate the difference between Mommy going to work and Mommy just disappearing all day. A 5-year old does. I think that until they are old enough to truly understand the purpose and necessity of the separation, those 35 hours are going to be experienced very differently.

Discuss.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Tue, 02-10-2009 - 10:12am

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That's what I think now. Apparently other people's children don't care.

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I agree with that, but I can't afford anything other than the 2-day Mother's Day Out program, and if I try the experiment, then I'm bound to it for an entire school year. If he continues to not adjust, then naturally that possibility causes me anxiety.

Gotta go. Be back tomorrow.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-29-2002
Tue, 02-10-2009 - 10:25am

"That's what I think now. Apparently other people's children don't care."

That was my experience: some kids care, some don't and many have an absolute blast at dc, even when they start as toddlers. I've run the gamut myself. Ds cared a lot when he was 10 months old and we first attempted to put him in dc (for just 15-20 hours per week, but a little bit every day). He screamed the house down for weeks and never adjusted. We gave up after about 6 weeks. Starting him in dc when he was 20 months old was an entirely different experience; he adjusted very quickly and enjoyed himself. Dd was yet another kettle of fish. She started when she was 2 years 8 months old and could hardly wait (this despite that fact that she was, if anything, even clingier as an infant/young toddler than ds). She ran into the place and never looked back. I actually ended up adjusting my work schedule upwards in terms of hours to accommodate her wishes to stay until after the afternoon snack (she made that request when she was about 3).

"I agree with that, but I can't afford anything other than the 2-day Mother's Day Out program, and if I try the experiment, then I'm bound to it for an entire school year. If he continues to not adjust, then naturally that possibility causes me anxiety."

That seriously sucks! And definitely makes it more difficult to try the experiment. I didn't realize that daycares could insist on signing up a child for an entire school year.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-05-2000
Tue, 02-10-2009 - 10:48am

Or as Joy says, "There is no such thing as Alex proof."

Chris

The truth may be out there but lies are in your head. Terry Pratchett

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-05-2000
Tue, 02-10-2009 - 11:07am

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"That's what I think now. Apparently other people's children don't care."

And that's what I said many posts ago. Erica couldn't tolerate being in dc and Dylan thrived in it.

Chris

The truth may be out there but lies are in your head. Terry Pratchett

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-03-2008
Tue, 02-10-2009 - 11:35am
Sorry... child led weaning.
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Tue, 02-10-2009 - 11:46am

I should be working or cleaning, but I'm back here already, LOL.

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Huh? What does one afternoon of labor got to do with being gone for 8 hours a day every day for a year? To answer your question, though, he'll go to the playground with Grandma (if it's daytime) while I'm in labor, and afterwards he and Daddy will visit me periodically while I'm waiting to be discharged.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Tue, 02-10-2009 - 11:58am

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Yeah, it will probably be a lot easier on both of us when we can actually communicate with each other. Right now he can say Mama, Dada, ball, cat, bye-bye, no, burp, ahwuboo (I love you), and diaper.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-31-2008
Tue, 02-10-2009 - 12:02pm

Huh? What does this have to do with a normal working schedule? I work a ft schedule and I work about 230 days a year, with 134 to frolic with the children at the playground if I so desire.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Tue, 02-10-2009 - 12:09pm
Ooops, ok, lol. FWIW, dd spoke late (not saying your ds is "late", mine was however) and she definitely had some melt-downs due to not being able to communicate. This could be part of the picture. He may feel that he will be understood somehow at home, but be unsure about how to communicate his needs/wants at school. What does his teacher say? How old is he? (Sorry, I forgot and I have siggies turned off for scrolling ease.) Does he ever have the same kind of meltdowns at home? If so, what brings them on?
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Tue, 02-10-2009 - 12:10pm

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The daycare doesn't, but if I accept a teaching position, then I am contracting to teach for that entire school year.

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