America's Fertility Decline

Avatar for Cmmelissa
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Registered: 11-13-2008
America's Fertility Decline
23
Tue, 02-05-2013 - 2:36pm

I thought the following article from the WSJ was pretty interesting.  It talks about how a society with declining fertility puts it at risk of having skewed age demographics, which causes many problems due to an aging population.  It claims that issues we are facing in the U.S., such as the economy, are caused by declining fertility rates: 

Low-fertility societies don't innovate because their incentives for consumption tilt overwhelmingly toward health care. They don't invest aggressively because, with the average age skewing higher, capital shifts to preserving and extending life and then begins drawing down. They cannot sustain social-security programs because they don't have enough workers to pay for the retirees. They cannot project power because they lack the money to pay for defense and the military-age manpower to serve in their armed forces.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323375204578270053387770718.html?mod=googlenews_wsj

They suggest that the decline in the U.S. is caused from stagnent middle class wages, more women getting college degrees and entering more varied careers than in past years.  I also think that high daycare costs, not to mention the basic costs of having a child, play into the decision to have fewer offspring.  

The articles gives a few ways to improve the fertility rate by making changes to social security, decreasing the costs of college tuition and improving infrastructures to make commuting more cost effective.  

What are your thoughts on the article?  With the current economy, do you think it's feasible for families to have more children? 

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Registered: 08-22-2009
Sun, 02-17-2013 - 2:06pm

  If it is put on credit cards it is still be funded by the person paying that credit card.

  Our DDs college was paid for from a variety of sources.  They all took out student loans,  DD1 and DD2 did work study.  There were some scholarhips and grants.

  DH and I paid a lot through savings.  We also took out parent loans.  The fact that we borrowed that money does not mean that we did not fund that portion

  Doing the happy dance that as of last Nov all our the college expences that DH and I  signed up for are paid in full. 

 

Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Sun, 02-17-2013 - 1:50pm

Empty, it is also a misunderstanding, I think. Many colleges now prefer CC payments, and it is cheaper and faster than wire transfers. The issue is not using a card as the payment method, the issue would be if you didn't or couldn't pay the CC bill. Not sure why there is a persistent misconception on this board that using a card to pay with means that you carry debt. 

Avatar for jamblessedthree
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Registered: 10-23-2001
Sun, 02-17-2013 - 12:00pm

Unless you're in the know of financial aid nobody really knows how somebody else is paying for college, You could say you are funding your kids education then place it all on credit card, It just makes you sound rich to say you are!  Lol!  But yes, Parents have an opportunity to instill the ethic of hard work like these parents have whom I admire while others fail at those teachable moments and let kids just get whatever they want. 

 


 


Avatar for jamblessedthree
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Registered: 10-23-2001
Sun, 02-17-2013 - 11:53am

Of course it's commendable, That's my point! 

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Sat, 02-16-2013 - 9:33pm
I thought it was the kids who worked hard and paid for their own education. If the parents are paying for nine kids college education, they must be working pretty hard. If they aren't paying for it, how does the working hard and having three kids in college fit together? I guess I am confused.
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-27-2005
Sat, 02-16-2013 - 8:02pm
I don't think she said that the students are putting themselves through school. She did say that they work hard which maybe I am wrong but thought she meant the parents. Not all parents have the resources to pay for an entire college education or they do not want to.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Sat, 02-16-2013 - 5:48pm
That is commendable that the two students are able to put themselves through university on their own earnings, Jam. What kind of work do they do that pays that well?
Avatar for jamblessedthree
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Registered: 10-23-2001
Sat, 02-16-2013 - 3:09pm
Ha, A good friend of mine has 10, She has three college age kids, One is at West Point and the other two are at well ranked universities, Her younger kids are following in those same foot steps. She and her husband are amazing people and amazing parents but they're no millionaires, Lol. Believe it or not, Some still work for things the hard way - they earn it.

 

 

Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Sat, 02-16-2013 - 9:32am

Bord, I met a demographer once who explained that the more resources people have, the fewer kids they have, on average. If you are just subsisting, it makes no difference anyway, so you crank them out. Once you have something to invest in your kids, you tend to have less kids in order to maximize the investment in each child.

College is a good example. If you have no hope or intention of helping with college, and perhaps not even any expectation that your kids might go, then it doesn't matter if you have 10 kids. Once it is feasible for you to educate your kids, you tend to limit the brrod to make it possible for them to go as far as possible.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Sat, 02-09-2013 - 11:11pm
I have heard many women say that they limited the size of their family or spaced their children far apart because they couldn't afford daycare for more than one or two at a time, or because they didn't think they'd be able to send more than two to college. So I so think many couples are looking long and hard at long term costs before deciding to have a third or even second child.