And Now for Something Completely Diff.

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Registered: 03-27-2003
And Now for Something Completely Diff.
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Wed, 06-06-2007 - 11:11am

How has your "generation" and your *parents* generation affected your life view and colored your decisions to sah/woh/wah/........?

What is your generation and what are your parents generations?

J

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Registered: 01-05-2000
Wed, 06-06-2007 - 11:36am

My parents were born just before/during the depression, came of age during WWII and married during the Korean War. I grew up in the 50's and 60's. I'll be 54 this year. I have been affected by my parents in that my (and my siblings) first thought about everything is that we can do it ourselves--sew the wedding gown instead of buying one; remodel the house instead of hiring it done. My parents have been supportive in whatever I did--homeschool (mom not so much but she didn't not support if that makes sense), sah, woh, wah. It was our lives and our families. And mom did say that we were right about homeschooling when Joy graduated high school.

Chris

The truth may be out there but lies are in your head. Terry Pratchett

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Wed, 06-06-2007 - 11:58am

My parents were depression era children who came of age during WWII. One of the things that they taught me is to pay as you go. This allowed our family to be able to have a sahp when the need presented itself.

My Mother was also of the generation the was not able to woh after children, but fought for our opportunities for that choice. Her (and her cohorts) made it much easier for me to woh after the birth of my children.

I am caught between the babyboomer generation and Gen X. I don't really have a generational identity.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Wed, 06-06-2007 - 1:22pm

my dad was and continues to be like that wrt money,too. the identification i see with that is an ultra conservative lifestyle that has never changed. even in times where the hottest inventions are the things to own,dad never believed in that sort of gratification. my mother was a sahm most of my life but chose to return to work p/t after my youngest was almost in high school. i think mom was probably more of a practical realist than the generation (my grandmother) before her. even though there were times i couldn't talk to her,i believe she really understood me and my generation.

p.s. i was born in 1964,too and agree about being inbetween two generation classifications. lol.

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Wed, 06-06-2007 - 1:46pm

My parents were born in 1931.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Wed, 06-06-2007 - 1:59pm

Talk about generation spanning try this on:
My dad was born in 1916 (yes Nineteen SIXTEEN)
my mother was born in 1926 (yes dad was a cradle robber)
my brother in 56, my late sister in 58
I came along 8 years later a suprise baby in 1966 (and I agree about us being the generation with out a catchy name)

My mother and father were both teachers of the deaf and they always lived on the campus of whatever school my dad was running (he was a superintendent). My mom taught before she was married, took a break until i turned 8 and then went back to work full time and didn't retire until 1995 I think when she was just shy of turning 70. My parents were depression kids and god forbid my mother ever saw you throw out a piece of tin foil... LOL. We lived simply and we never went in for the 'newest/greatest/latest' which I think is why I just can not understand people who spend thousands of dollars on a television set, but I digress.

I think I was most influenced by the type of work they did. They had a calling and devoted their lives to it (as both of them were children of deaf parents -- yup I had four deaf grandparents) they were not concerned with making a ton of money they were concerned with service. Their example definitely informed the paths my brother, sister and I took. My brother is a respected 21 year veteran criminal prosecutor who will probably be ajudge some day (he's been on the short list for an appt. twice now). His friends who work for big law firms probably make 4-5 times what he does but he is passionate about his work and I'm so proud ofhim. My late sister ran several nonprofits and policital organizations before she chucked that for her true calling of managing an antique store before she died in 2003 and we all know I'm a nonprofit lifer. We grew up poor but with an understanding of 'service before self' and as my dad used to say "why be here Katherine...why BE here if you aren't making a difference" so in my own way as a crusader for the arts that's what I try to do. i'm not sure how much of this was generation and how much was just the personalities of my parents but there you have it!

 

Yes. We. Did.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Wed, 06-06-2007 - 2:09pm
i'm impressed by that modesty,matherine. all too familiar because that's how dad and mom were with me and my siblings,too (maybe a catholic thing. bwah)....amazing how money was never the thing to be valued,either. finding soemthing you love to do was. bravo. :)

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Wed, 06-06-2007 - 2:12pm
I understand. I am the oldest and my Mom was born in 1929. Her Dad was born in 1888. Growing up I had friends whose grandfathers were in WWII when mine was a veteran *before* WWI!
Avatar for mkatherine
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Wed, 06-06-2007 - 2:16pm
My dad was a WWII veteran and I remember when our principal came to my class in Dday in sixth grade and said "many of you probably have grandfathers that fought in WWII" and I proudly piped up 'my dad fought in WWII" and the principal WOULD NOT BELIEVE ME. I finally explained my father had been fifty when I was born! LOL

 

Yes. We. Did.

Avatar for mom34101
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Registered: 03-27-2003
Wed, 06-06-2007 - 3:38pm

I'm a baby boomer (born in 1959), and I think I've been very influenced by the baby-boomer mentality, especially being the youngest of six kids, three of whom are 10-15 years older. I've always expected to work hard for what I want (and for me, that included sah when my kids were younger).

My parents grew up during the depression. They definitely remembered hard times and believed in paying as you go, and I think their financial attitudes played into my ability to be a sahm when my kids were younger. I'm pretty conservative about money (in some ways, I've been too conservative in the past, which is partly due to my parents' aversion to any kind of debt, and something I hope my own kids do better with). For the most part, my parents have supported our sah/woh choices (my siblings and I have pretty much run the gamut on the sah/woh thing), as long as we're financially stable.




Edited 6/6/2007 3:39 pm ET by mom34101
Community Leader
Registered: 02-06-2006
Wed, 06-06-2007 - 5:52pm

My parents are baby boomers (1947 & 1948). Their parents were all born between 1920-1924.

I was born in 1981.

I come from strong, independent women on both sides of my family. My paternal grandmother was management at AT&T (before it split into the baby bells) in the 1960s and 70s and didnt retire until the 80's. She began woh when her youngest child was 3. My maternal grandmother divorced her husband in 1951 because he was an abusive alcoholic. At the time she had a 2 year old and a newborn. She was a single mom (in the 50s!!!!) for 8 years before remarrying. She worked many different jobs to support her girls...they ranged from coal washer (in a coal mine) to butcher to telephone operator. She worked up until the 1980s as well. My mother is an accountant in a high level govt position, and though she has 33 years of service and could easily retire, shes still working.

The whole SAHM thing is pretty foreign to me!!! :-)

As for how all this has affected me...my mom has always said she doesnt care if my sister and I woh or sah when we have children. The only thing she has drilled into both of us since birth is to be capable of financial indpedence. Go to college, have a career, establish yourself first....then have kids and make the SAH v. WOH decision. Be able to take care of yourself. Its ok to rely on someone, but only if you dont NEED to.

Her beliefs are colored by her mother's experience (divorced from the alcoholic) and her own. She married my sister's father at 18, had a baby at 19 and was a single mom by 23. She put herself through school, worked full time all while essentially rasing my sister alone.

She didnt want either of us to have such a tough road to hoe.

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