Anyone want to work from home??

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-13-2008
Anyone want to work from home??
75
Wed, 02-13-2008 - 2:45pm

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iVillage Member
Registered: 10-24-2007
Tue, 03-04-2008 - 5:11pm

I went to a friend's house last night to fix her computer, and she virtually begged me to go to her next Arbonne presentation.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-04-2008
Tue, 03-04-2008 - 9:56pm
I
Avatar for myshkamouse
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Tue, 03-04-2008 - 11:20pm
Oh my GOD. Do you really believe that?
How about a circle shaped company? Kumba ya and all. LOL>
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-05-2000
Wed, 03-05-2008 - 12:35am

Anything you do that generates an income involves some type of selling. I have an ah business. I sew historical clothing for reenactors. I sell my talent, my expertize, and my services. My sister runs a home daycare. She sells her knowledge, skills, and 26+ years of experience. When my dh had his home-based photography business, he sold his ability to take great pictures of children and pets. Free lance writers sell their ability to communicate well. Someone who sells Avon or MaryKay sells their ability to choose makeup for their customers. Above all, in order to make any business successful, one must be able to sell themselves to others.

Make a list of what you enjoy doing. Then ask yourself these questions: 1)do I like it enough to do it even when I don't feel like it (customers expect results done in a timely fashion); 2) is there a need/want for my services/product; 3) will I need some other care in order to work at home; 4) do I have the knowledge to run my business and do I know where to get that knowledge? Then there are the logistics: where will you work; when will you work; will your dh shoulder a share of the running of the family (housework, cooking, child care); do you need to come up with upfront money to get started?

Working at home is work. The people I know who have made a success at it have treated it like any other business. They have set hours when they are not available to family and friends. This can be hard on young children as they don't understand that mom/dad is home but not available to them. It also can be hard on yourself. You must be disciplined enough to ignore the phone (let voice mail take the call) and all other distractions at home during working hours. If you work around other family members' schedules, you can find yourself excluded from family life. Personally, I found that sending my son to daycare while I sewed at home worked out best for both of us. He loved being in the family setting of the home daycare we used and I didn't have to worry about him being around sharp objects, sewing machines and hot irons. Ane we still had a family life on the weekends.

Chris

The truth may be out there but lies are in your head. Terry Pratchett

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Wed, 03-05-2008 - 2:00am
OK, there are some legit work at home options out there. When dd was little, I used to do translation at home. It did not pay very well, but it was something. As far as I know there are also companies that will have you type up transcripts of various kinds at home. If you know basic bookkeeping that is something that can be done at home, if it is on a reasonably small scale. I gotta tell you though, that working at home with a screaming baby in the house is not easy.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Wed, 03-05-2008 - 2:04am
OT, but I have been meaning to ask you for a while if you know this site http://www.vintagesewing.info/1940s/42-mpd/mpd-09.html I posted a link to a sample page, but the site has several old books on pattern making, in full, right there on the site. Dd found it and is having a ball with it. She made herself a bodice sloper from the 40s book and is all fired up about it.
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-12-2005
Wed, 03-05-2008 - 6:59am

I have found myself so turned off by friends trying to make money off of me. If they ask once, fine, but when they ask twice, it starts to have an impact on my friendship with them. What's more, it seems that they cannot fathom why their friends are offended by being turned into a source of income, and complain that they are disappointed in the lack of support from their friends. I'm sorry, but I don't expect them pay me, so why in the world would they think that being a supportive friend means giving them my money in return for a product I do not want, or even a product I do want, but could get cheaper elsewhere--I'm essentially handing my friend the difference in price.

I lump together any company that instructs their "salespeople" to sell to friends and family. I don't care how the company is organized, if you are pushing the idea of turning friends and family members into customers, my opinion of the company is pretty low.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-24-2007
Wed, 03-05-2008 - 7:30am

I don't know what your skills are or how well they fit in with working from home, but one thing that a lot of people do that requires few skills and is very flexible is selling on eBay.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-24-2007
Wed, 03-05-2008 - 8:05am

>>why in the world would they think that being a supportive friend means giving them my money in return for a product I do not want, or even a product I do want, but could get cheaper elsewhere--I'm essentially handing my friend the difference in price.<<


Exactly!

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-12-2005
Wed, 03-05-2008 - 9:24am
That's exactly why I have such distaste for the companies--because they have this way of turning kind, generous, thoughtful people into these Stepford salespeople with dollar signs in their eyes, blinding them to the fact that they are trying to rip off family & friends by charging inflated prices in order to make a profit.

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