Are schools fair to working parents?

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-30-2011
Are schools fair to working parents?
99
Fri, 03-16-2012 - 2:38pm

I said parents because I think that working dads miss out even more than the moms do when it comes to school activites.

Chelsea

"Minds are like parachutes. They only function when they are open."

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Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Tue, 03-20-2012 - 4:01pm
But why do those little ones fall apart? Because the parents have set up the false expectation that they'll be there for every. little. thing. At some point, be it Kindergarten, 6th grade or Junior Year, mommy is going to miss something, and if the kid has been told forever that mommy will always be there, then said kid will fall apart. It's bad enough when it's a KGer, but I've seen HS kids lose it because mommy had to miss something.

We need to set up realistic expectations with our children.

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Tue, 03-20-2012 - 3:51pm

I don't think it's just naivete.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2010
Tue, 03-20-2012 - 3:19pm
jamblessedthree wrote:
Those experiences sound limited, How cool is it that school can offer an online german class when ONLY two kids are interested in taking it? I wish our high school offered more than the two languages they do or looked at other ways to offer language if they don't have the classrooms or teachers to teach, My kid is finishing her second year of French and she's tired of it, She'll get it again next year.. My whole point was about a Phoenix type school when I brought this up to begin with.

This is exactly where online classes come into play, stretching the limited experiences, ime.

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Tue, 03-20-2012 - 2:36pm
Ahhhh, the naivete of the mom with young kids. Wait until your kids are older - the guilt goes away. Or should. Hopefully you'll learn that guilt isn't a helpful emotion. And most of the time isn't even guilt - guilt should only apply when you've actually done something wrong.

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2008
Tue, 03-20-2012 - 2:00pm
Cookie,

I'm going to have to agree with you on this subject. My dd is in Kindergarten this year and there have been IMO, TOO many activities. It seems like every month there are 2-3 events that they are requesting parents to be at. Just like yesterday, the first day back from school, they have a Boosterthon Fun Run that they ask parents to be at to cheer the kids on. Thankfully my mom was able to go in mine and my ExH's place, but I just felt bad missing out on that.
Yes like other posters have said, we can't make them all. I just feel gulity when I can't make it and my ExH can't make it.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2000
Tue, 03-20-2012 - 11:22am

I totally agree.

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Tue, 03-20-2012 - 10:42am
Do you think only Phoenixes and Waldens offer online courses? If so, you're very wrong. Most, brick-and-mortar schools offer lots of online courses.

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Tue, 03-20-2012 - 10:38am
Life isn't fair.

It would be impossible to schedule all school-related activities and events in a way that *every parent* could attend and/or participate.

<< feel bad that I have to pick and choose what I can attend.>.

Get used to it. That's what parenting is all about. Now that I have a 15yo and an 11yo, work FT, have a social life, have volunteer duties, a household to take care of, an exercise routine, and extended family, pets, etc, my life is all about picking and choosing.

And, imo, many school activities really arent' that big of a deal - to the kid or the parents. Is my child going to be scarred if I don't see him walk on the stage to get his "I attended Physical Fitness Day" certificate? Is he going to care that I wasn't one of the 5% of parents that came to the classroom to read on Dr. Seuss day?

In the grand scheme of things, this is barely a blip on my radar. I'll do what I need to do to be active adn involved in my kids' life. The school's schedule isn't going to determine that for me.

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009
Tue, 03-20-2012 - 10:23am

University of Maryland has entire degree programs that are online.

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Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Tue, 03-20-2012 - 9:59am
Your school may allow your daughter to do another language online instead of the two they offer. There are also summer immersion programs you can send your child to where she can get a full year of high school language credit in just four weeks if she's tired of the traditional format. My son got two years of French that way.

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