Bringing kids to work?

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-14-2006
Bringing kids to work?
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Sat, 01-26-2008 - 8:20pm

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iVillage Member
Registered: 11-28-2007
Sat, 01-26-2008 - 8:48pm
I think it really depends on the work environment.
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P
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sun, 01-27-2008 - 12:50pm
I think it's a bad idea. A young child (and who else would it be if it's ongoing?) needs supervision and interaction. A parent can't provide these things without taking away from the work they are doing for pay. Really the only exception I can think of is in-home dc provider where one's own child can be put with the other children and supervised/interacted with as part of the group. Which is why we on this board are always telling WAHM-hopefuls that they will need to get some childcare in place if they want to get any work done.
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Sun, 01-27-2008 - 12:53pm

I wouldn't bring Samantha to work with me unless I had a burning desire to refile all of my paperwork the next day. But if she were older and could occupy herself for several hours at a time with minimal interaction from me, I think it'd be okay. If she were 10 or 11, she could easily sit and read or play on the computer while I worked.

ETA: Hmm. I just reread the OP. It wouldn't work though on a regular basis. Possibly if I homeschooled and could have her working on her school work while I worked. But otherwise, if she were old enough to occupy herself for 7.5 hours each day while I worked, she would be in school during that time anyway.




Edited 1/27/2008 12:55 pm ET by geschichtsgal
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sun, 01-27-2008 - 1:02pm
I disagree completely. The only setting where it could be ok to "bring" your kids to work is the one where you don't bring them at all and are a WAHM. And even then, you need childcare in place unless you are an in-home dc provider who can mix your kids in with the other kids. Teaching summer school (or any other WOHM job) would NOT be ok or in any way appropriate to bring your kid in on a routine (rather than ocassional) basis. If you are teachig summer school, your focus needs to be 100% on TEACHING the kids in your care. This is entirely different than putting your own kids in the mix in home daycare- where they are likely similar ages to the kids paid to be there and will benefit from the same activities and need the same level of supervision. If a kid is old enough to be in summer school, they are too old to benefit from whatever games you think up to amuse a toddler and will be distracted from their own work. Just as you would be distracted by whatever needs to be done with the toddler or baby and would not give your full attention to TEACHING the kids you are responsible for teaching. They are spending precious summer hours in your classroom and would rather be outside playing. If you force them to waste those precious hours by making them watch you care for your child rather than be taught by you, you've been both irresponsible and innapropriate. And downright mean for forcing them to sit in a classroom while you do childcare and their beautiful, limited summer ticks away.
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-24-2007
Sun, 01-27-2008 - 1:09pm

As an employer, if I felt that it helped me get and retain better staff, then I would provide an on-site creche.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sun, 01-27-2008 - 1:10pm
That's the thing. The premise is that it's ongoing. If a kid is old enough to need very minimal supervision, there are other places that it would be better for them to be (school if it's that time of year, playing outside if it's vacation). I think even a home-schooled child would be ill-served by being dragged to mom's work every day. If they are anything other than self-taught, they will need a fair bit of teaching from mom and will need to interrupt her work with questions. Also, one of the big advantages to home-schooling that is often given is how it frees the student to go out "in the field" and learn in more diverse ways than just sitting at a desk. This would take away that advantage or at any rate severly limit it- given that they would now be obliged to be "at a desk" for even more hours per day than their traditionally schooled peers.
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-28-2007
Sun, 01-27-2008 - 1:44pm
I guess I was thinking of a similarly aged child.
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P
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sun, 01-27-2008 - 1:48pm
No sooner had I typed this when I flipped open the paper and was provided with an example of when a WOHM can bring her kid to work every day and it's ok. It was an interview with Sheryl Crow where she described bringing her baby on tour. And then I remembered that several movie stars have described bringing their babies on set for the entire filming. I stand by my original assertion that WOHMS shouldn't routinely bring their kids to work but rock stars and movie stars can do so many things that other WOHMS can't. Such as bring their nannies to work with them every day so that their children can come too without compromising work.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Sun, 01-27-2008 - 2:03pm
i don't think we have the right to determine what's best for anybody but ourselves and our own children..i have a friend who works at

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sun, 01-27-2008 - 2:32pm

Depends on the job and whether or not its allowed. I can't imagine getting much work done with kids around, but otoh, if a parent works at say a daycare or something, then I can see it.


My best friends dd was able to bring her son to work with her when he was a newborn. It worked out really well, but he was an easy baby and it was not an every day thing. She also stopped completely once he was mobile. This was a very casual office environment and she had worked there for several years prior to having the baby too.

Dj


"Now when I need help, I look in the mirror" ~Kanye West~


Dj

"Now when I need help, I look in the mirror" ~Kanye West~

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