Buriedor ignored discussionon SES

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Buriedor ignored discussionon SES
51
Sun, 03-30-2003 - 8:49am
I prefer to believe it was buried. CLW believes that SES is one of the key determining factors in how a kid turns out. I am cutting and pasting my post here..

Where? What studies? What are the criteria for turning out "well"? Is it only earnings? I am still waiting to see all of this research and I am not sure how, aside from finances, turning out well could be quantified. Would my friend, the dd of a high earning succesful business man, who dropped out of college, took an average job and spends a great portion of her time volunteering at women's shelters have turned out well? Would she not have turned out well because her earnings dropped her down in SES from where she started? Would the guy who hates what he does but earns more than his high earning parents meet the criteria for turning out well?

SUS

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Wed, 04-02-2003 - 6:36am
You're welcome. Just fighting the good fight here, for greater understanding of statistical data everywhere! :)

You are studying education, right? Why not ask one of your professors for leads to track down that original data? You'd probably have to go back a lot of years, but original studies involving Headstart or Title I might be available someplace. And Rand.org, where I got the link I posted, does studies about education for legislative purposes. They might have information available to the public?

I agree that it's maddening that these studies are done this way (it's like doing a motion problem in physics, but assuming no gravity or friction -- where in reality is that situation going to exist???). The problem now is, the researchers are saying "But everybody knows this...", 40+ years have gone by, and, no, everybody DOESN'T know this.

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