Can you all stand a new study

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Can you all stand a new study
17
Sat, 08-09-2003 - 12:21pm
Okay - I don't know how new it is and I did a quick cursory search (sorry I haven't been around, been in total overload) and didn't see anything - which in itself could say something about the bias against daycare (but I don't know that for sure, it *could be* a lot of factors...)


ANYWAY


In this month's Child there is this blurb: (all typos may be attributed to me)

There's no difference in the activity levels or emotional development of 3 yos who attend daycare and those who are cared for int he home, according to a new study from the Univeristy of Bristol. . The research is part of an ongoing study of the health and well being of 14,00 kids born in the early 1990s. One of the more surprising findings - facotrs that we thought that would affect a child's temperment such as whether a mom works make no difference" says co study author. Parenst who WOH when their children are small can be reassured that there employment is likelty to have a negative effect. Of course quality dc is important as is loving, responive interaction with parents.

I;d liek to see more of the study - but any thoughts? Would you believe one (the old disproven one ;-) ) over the other? Why or why not?

SUS

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sat, 08-09-2003 - 2:24pm
BLURB REPOSTED FOR EAISER AND COHERENT READING


I have been doing WAY too much typing these days - anyway

In this month's Child there is this blurb: (all typos may be attributed to me)

There's no difference in the activity levels or emotional development of 3 yos who attend daycare and those who are cared for in the home, according to a new study from the University of Bristol. . The research is part of an ongoing study of the health and well-being of 14,000 kids born in the early 1990s. One of the more surprising findings - factors that we thought that would affect a child's temperament such as whether a mom works make no difference" says co study author. Parents who WOH when their children are small can be reassured that there employment is NOT likely to have a negative effect. Of course quality dc is important as is loving, responsive interaction with parents.

SUS

Avatar for cyndiluwho
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sat, 08-09-2003 - 2:28pm
I do find it irritating that studies that say dc is ok end up in little blurbs and studies that say they found a difference that may or may not actually mean anything end up on the front page and are used as reason to crucify WM's. What you find in a study has a lot to do with the controls you use. I'd have to read what they controlled for before I could decide on this one but it does fit with my personal experience. I've watched my kids thrive in dc.
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-04-2003
Sat, 08-09-2003 - 2:42pm
That study is why I stopped by today to say hi and see if anyone had actual information beyond the blurb that Child magazine gave. I could not find anything on the internet. I am somewhat interested to see if they controlled for education level of parents, because I have read in other studies that once education of parents is controlled for, the positive impact of parental care over day care goes up. The less educated the parent, the better off the child is in daycare.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sat, 08-09-2003 - 5:00pm
I have to disagree with your last line.

Although education most definitely CAN play a role a parent's ability, I don't think that statement is true. I've known many, mnay, many uneducated mothers that were excellent mothers. They were nurturing, smart, moral, etc, etc .. adn made great mothers and SAH. And I've know some extremely educated people who were terrible parents and had their kids in dc.

Hollie

Avatar for cyndiluwho
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sat, 08-09-2003 - 8:04pm
I agree. I wonder if she's mixing education up with SES. I have read that kids from low SES do benefit from dc. As to the study, you can slice and dice to say what you want. Negative headlines are sensational and get you press coverage. Neutrals are burried in little blurbs with little detail. While you can slice data to say what you want, there's enough data going both ways out there to lead me to believe that it simply doesn't make a difference. It's six of one and half dozen of the other. You have to look at your situation and how moms working status affects your situation. I'm big on understanding why you believe/do what you do precisely for that reason. There is no clearcut right/better/optimum here. You do what is best for your situation and to make that decision you need to understand your situation and the ramifications of your decision.
Avatar for val10154
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-26-2003
Sat, 08-09-2003 - 9:43pm
I would lean towards agreeing more w/ this study, simply b/c I don't think working/non-working status has much to do w/ anything. It's the way a mother is, whether you're a SAHM or WOHM. Being a SAHM doesn't automatically make you a "good" mother who raises kids that are emotionally stable & being a WOHM doesn't automatically make you a "bad" mother who raises kids that are not emotionally stable.

BTW, what in the world is SES? I keep seeing it on the boards & I can generally figure out abbreviations, but I can't w/ this one.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-29-2003
Sat, 08-09-2003 - 10:45pm
SocioEconomic Status
Avatar for val10154
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-26-2003
Sat, 08-09-2003 - 10:51pm
OOOHHH!!! Thanx!
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sun, 08-10-2003 - 10:36am
Wow for all that research you have studied, you have only found links to SES - that is pretty amazing. I thought this was pretty common knowledge among the research group, they tie it from everything to epidurals and breastfeeding to tv usage and graduate degrees. Now while there MAY be a correlation between SES and education (definitley not across the board), studies frequently isolate the level of the mother's education and devlopmental factors in a child (good or bad).


Just a few on the first page of a Google search:

http://www.nald.ca/fulltext/roi/page3.htm

http://www.childstats.gov/ac2000/spectxt.asp

http://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/2001/section2/tables/t09_1.asp

http://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/2001/section2/tables/t09_2.asp

http://www.worldbank.org/poverty/wdrpoverty/events/educpres.pdf

http://www.journalofpoverty.org/jopabs/jopabs4.htm

SUS

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-20-2001
Sun, 08-10-2003 - 10:46am
I knew that all along. I think some adults just don't get that kids will be kids. n/t

 

Linda - wife, mother, grandmum                     &nb

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