College

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
College
89
Sat, 10-29-2011 - 9:01am

Will/are you encouraging your child(ren) into practical or academic pursuits in college?

Do you think your working status has made an impact on your decision?

I am 37 years old and in my first year in college and I am still feeling out my major. At a recent dinner party, I was introduced to a student that attends the same community college that I do. When I told her that I was considering transferring to the state university to pursue a degree in sociology, she nearly spit her drink out of her nose in laughter and told me that it would be completely worthless. She's getting an associate's degree in social work and already knows the wage and benefit package to work as an eligibility specialist at the Department of Human Services. She's going to make $18 an hour and have $7 copays on her comprehensive medical plan.

Aside from her bluntless, I keep having this same conversation with other students no matter their age; they are highly specific in their college plans and know how much they'll make when they finish, and it blows their mind that I really don't a plan. I understand that student debt is an issue, which is exactly why I am going to a community college to knock out the basics and a handful of core credits. I am scheduled for an academic advising appointment next week and I wonder if each degree comes with a sheet selling each student on return of investment for their time and student loan dollars? This attitude is so persistant that I'm considering making an application for the dental hygiene program instead (which I have an interest in), and only return to school once I am settled in a lucrative and flexible position to study what I want.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2007
Sat, 10-29-2011 - 9:25am

We are encouraging our children to pursue something that they like or for which they have a passion, with the caveat of having a backup plan if neccessary.

ODS is leaning toward some sort of engineering or physics or a combination of both. DH was a physics engineering major.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Sat, 10-29-2011 - 10:03am

true story, friends of ours pay the full ride for their kids' college.

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Sat, 10-29-2011 - 10:03am

Tryingtoquit, your post made me smile. Your YDS sounds awesome!

I also have an engineering son like your ODS. They talked about college in school and he came to ask me, "if I go to college for 8 years for math and science, do you think I'll be able to get a job?" You have to love that personality type :)

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Sat, 10-29-2011 - 10:25am
BTDT

We left it totally up to our DD.

DD1 has a degree in finance/economics. Works in the banking industry. Got a promption yesterday yeah!

DD2 has a degree in elementary education. Teaches first grade.

DD3 has a degree in communications. Works in the insurance industry but plans to return to school next year and get her Masters in sociology.
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Sat, 10-29-2011 - 10:32am

Egd3blessed, I would think that science-heavy pre-med track would be practical for lots of things.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Sat, 10-29-2011 - 10:34am
I'd be thrilled if my children pursued an education in what they loved and mastered that field of study. My daughter excels in math and science as a junior in hs but she doesn't have a career in mind yet. I'm just glad my oldest son, a freshman in hs, likes hs much better than jhs. He loves animal but I don't see him having enough interest in science to get to vet school. He loves cooking, and I would support his interest in that, but I would hope he'd get a 4yr degree first. My youngest son has wanted to be a civil engineer since a 2nd grade career day presentation.

I don't think of college as job training. I hope my children have interests that turn into lucrative careers, but I don't expect them to be finished products, safely ensconced in their career, at 22.

IME, there's nothing wrong with bouncing around from interest to interest to in your 20s as long as you can be self-supporting. I lived as a student, teacher, waitress, musician, bartender, and librarian and traveled extensively throughout most of my 20s and finally settled into a career in software design and development in my early 30s.
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Sat, 10-29-2011 - 10:41am

Emptynester2009, you must be very proud. It sounds as though they are all doing well :)

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-05-2000
Sat, 10-29-2011 - 11:11am

Knowing Dylan as I do, I'm suggesting a blue collar trade--welding is frequently mentioned.

The truth may be out there but lies are in your head. Terry Pratchett

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2010
Sat, 10-29-2011 - 11:56am

Your YDS's enthusiasm is cute.

“Clearly," said Arthur,"you're an idiot- but you're our kind of idiot. Come on.” 
― Markus ZusakThe Book Thief

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2010
Sat, 10-29-2011 - 12:10pm

I will talk to them about future plans, but I'm not planning on telling them they should do something other than what they pick to make more money.

Dd1 is very much into dance and music so it looks like she will pursue that in college. Dd2 wants to be an fbi profiler--I think she just watches too much tv.

“Clearly," said Arthur,"you're an idiot- but you're our kind of idiot. Come on.” 
― Markus ZusakThe Book Thief

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