College

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
College
89
Sat, 10-29-2011 - 9:01am

Will/are you encouraging your child(ren) into practical or academic pursuits in college?

Do you think your working status has made an impact on your decision?

I am 37 years old and in my first year in college and I am still feeling out my major. At a recent dinner party, I was introduced to a student that attends the same community college that I do. When I told her that I was considering transferring to the state university to pursue a degree in sociology, she nearly spit her drink out of her nose in laughter and told me that it would be completely worthless. She's getting an associate's degree in social work and already knows the wage and benefit package to work as an eligibility specialist at the Department of Human Services. She's going to make $18 an hour and have $7 copays on her comprehensive medical plan.

Aside from her bluntless, I keep having this same conversation with other students no matter their age; they are highly specific in their college plans and know how much they'll make when they finish, and it blows their mind that I really don't a plan. I understand that student debt is an issue, which is exactly why I am going to a community college to knock out the basics and a handful of core credits. I am scheduled for an academic advising appointment next week and I wonder if each degree comes with a sheet selling each student on return of investment for their time and student loan dollars? This attitude is so persistant that I'm considering making an application for the dental hygiene program instead (which I have an interest in), and only return to school once I am settled in a lucrative and flexible position to study what I want.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Sat, 10-29-2011 - 4:42pm

My children can either 1) get certified/trained/degreed in some marketable skill, or 2) get a degree





iVillage Member
Registered: 07-18-2006
Sat, 10-29-2011 - 4:09pm

I think this answer will vary widely depending on the age of the kids, but for the most part? My advice is to do what you love, and it will never seem like work. Just make sure you know the amount of money and plan accordingly, and don't live above your means.

I hope by the time my kids' are old enough, this economy will have turned around. I feel very sorry for college graduates today. Instead of heading up the corporate ladder, they're headed down to their parents' basements.

Angie

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Sat, 10-29-2011 - 3:02pm

I really hate the anti-intellectualism prevalent on so many college campuses these days. College is not, and should not be, a trade school. For most high-paying professions, you really need a master's degree at the very least, so why not study something you enjoy as an undergrad?

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2010
Sat, 10-29-2011 - 2:21pm

yes they told her she was too slow of a runner to ever be a police officer & she'd better come up with something else.

“Clearly," said Arthur,"you're an idiot- but you're our kind of idiot. Come on.” 
― Markus ZusakThe Book Thief

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Sat, 10-29-2011 - 2:18pm
your last paragraph confuses me, does your friend and the bio dad tell the girl she is a slow runner? there are things i would never tell a child, kids tend to lvie up to what they are told they are.

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Sat, 10-29-2011 - 2:14pm
i agree that there's a slim chance that at 22 you find your career for life. i think 30s and even 40s is the time some reach true goals, and having kids can delay that even more.

my dad used to say you're never a finished product and that you should never stop learning.

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Sat, 10-29-2011 - 2:10pm

yes, i've heard there's a small minority of those who enter the seminary that actually graduate.

 

Avatar for mom34101
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sat, 10-29-2011 - 1:43pm
I think it's a given that my dd14 will go into liberal arts. Her dream is to be a novelist and so far, she has no backup plan. I was reading an editorial the other day that claimed 50% of humanities majors are currently not employed in any field that requires a college degree. (It was a pro-STEM article, so no idea whether the statistic was valid or where it came from). I'm not sure about my dd12. She is very linguistically inclined like her sister, but is also very strong in math and loves computers, so maybe she'll end up in computer science like her dad. I see the purpose of college as education rather than "getting a job," so I won't be pushing my kids towards some particular field because it's lucrative. I want them to follow their own interests and find something they'll be happy with, regardless of how much money they'll make. But I do think that what they want to do will likely play into our decisions about which college they choose. If my dd1 really wants to study creative writing in college, I may be encouraging her to go in-state so she won't have loans to pay back.
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Sat, 10-29-2011 - 1:10pm
I am even more proud after last week. It was rough week, DMIL died. It was out of state and all three girls took time off work to be there, were absolutely wonderful in difficult circumstances.

Doesn't seem quite right to say there was a highlight when attending a funeral but there was. The funeral was about 2.5 hours from the burial and we all rode together. I think it was the first time all 5 of us were in a car together since we moved DD1 to college in 2001.
It was so much fun having that time to talk.
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2010
Sat, 10-29-2011 - 12:10pm

I will talk to them about future plans, but I'm not planning on telling them they should do something other than what they pick to make more money.

Dd1 is very much into dance and music so it looks like she will pursue that in college. Dd2 wants to be an fbi profiler--I think she just watches too much tv.

“Clearly," said Arthur,"you're an idiot- but you're our kind of idiot. Come on.” 
― Markus ZusakThe Book Thief

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