Daycare and infant feeding

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-08-2001
Daycare and infant feeding
98
Tue, 01-26-2010 - 10:22am

Hi! It's been pointed out to me that this board is debating infant feeding, while the Breastmilk vs. Formula board has been debating daycares. I thought I would bring that topic here for discussion.


The questions being asked are this:


Do either BF or FF babies require more overall care at daycare?


Do either BF or FF babies require more one-on-one time at daycare?


Should there be a different fee for daycare for either BF or FF babies?


And another question that's been asked in other threads but I thought

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Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Thu, 01-28-2010 - 10:48am

No, sorry, they boiled, or scalded, it for themselves as well. It can carry listeria, among other things probably. By law, they were not allowed to sell it to us at all. Also, if you have ever milked cows in a barn, even the cleanest of barns and the cleanest of cows, you know how ever-present and close by the dung always is.

With the eggs it was different. Our nearest neighbor was extremely offended that the government had decided that her eggs had to be inspected for salmonella before they could be sold. She claimed, no doubt correctly, that she had never had salmonella in her chickens and clearly associated such a thing with lack of hygiene and substandard living conditions for the animals, which largely holds.

~~~~~ o o o ~~~~

Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much.

Oscar Wilde

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Thu, 01-28-2010 - 10:55am

Some of the advice really was not true. That something sometimes may be true for some people does not make it a general truth. Presenting something as *the* way and the only way, when there actually are other ways as well, is, IMHO, counter-productive and unhelpful. Over the years I have managed to help several women breastfeed, after the midwives etc had completely terrified and discouraged them. As with medicated births, there is unfortunately so much tension associated with the subject, that people tend to take extreme positions on both sides.

And no, no offense taken in the least. I do not have a horse in this race.

~~~~~ o o o ~~~~

Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much.

Oscar Wilde

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-05-2000
Thu, 01-28-2010 - 11:56am

To take your last point first, you (general you) nurse 24/7 to UNCLOG milk ducts. Either you or the person who told you got it backwards. All of the advice (which either the person who told you or you took as set in concrete) in your post are highly depended on the age of the child and their personalities. Breastfeeding is what you make of it. It's highly individual to each child. I was told with Joy to have her nurse 10 minutes each side (20 minutes total) for each feeding. That worked for her. With Erica, she only wanted to nurse 5 minutes total, all on one side. So I block fed her--nursed only on one side, 5 minutes at a time, for about 1.5-2 hours. Then changed sides. She took the majority of her feedings during the day and was sleeping 5-6 hours at night around 2-3 months. Dylan nursed the longest, 2.5 years about, and had formula at dc. He didn't stop nursing at night until he was over 2 and I "encouraged" him to stop.

I only went to one LLL meeting. It was too militant for my taste and I never went back. Joy's experiences with LLL meetings are totally different and she still goes, 3 babies later. Heck, even Erica goes. By herself, if Joy can't make it.

Chris

The truth may be out there but lies are in your head. Terry Pratchett

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Thu, 01-28-2010 - 12:58pm
I am also evil. I got stuck in heavy traffic once and told the nanny it was okay to microwave the frozen EBM because we were out of fresh and my son was howling. He lived.
Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Thu, 01-28-2010 - 6:09pm
I meant that it was to unclog ducts. Point is that there are simpler ways to unclog ducts than to nurse every hour 24/7. The particular LLL person was, indeed, militant. Not all of them are, which is good. Basically, I am just opposed to militancy generally, truth be told. It bugs me when some crazed woman tells me to nurse every hour for days, when I am already tired, frustrated and in pain. It equally bugs me when some woman chirps that the doctor told her she couldn't BF because she had a C-section, so she never bothered trying, just took the shot to stop the milk.

~~~~~ o o o ~~~~

Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much.

Oscar Wilde

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Thu, 01-28-2010 - 6:21pm
I didn't realize that there was an even simpler way to unclog milk ducts than frequent emptying of the breasts. What is it? (genuine question)














Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Thu, 01-28-2010 - 6:36pm

Standing under a hot shower and massaging the sore spots works. It also works to massage any sore spots as you are nursing and making sure you empty at least one breast completely at each feeding. I used the method of emptying one breast and latching the other at each feeding.

OTOH, nursing every hour for days on end will increase your production, and will often make the problem worse. I had clogged ducts because I was producing milk for 5 babies it seemed like. Increasing production would NOT have been a good idea in my case. Besides, pumping did not work well for me and by the time I had this problem (when dd was about 8-9 weeks) she already slept at least 6 hours at a stretch and I was not about to mess with that and try to force her to eat efficiently every hour.

~~~~~ o o o ~~~~

Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much.

Oscar Wilde

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Thu, 01-28-2010 - 6:47pm

Good to know. I never got more than a few drops out when I did either of those techniques, but I guess they're more effective for some than others.

I will certainly agree, though, that "every hour on the hour for 24 hours" is too extreme for my taste as well. There's frequent nursing and then there is non-stop, no-sleep, going insane nursing, LOL.















iVillage Member
Registered: 02-06-2009
Fri, 01-29-2010 - 7:35am

I haven't ever microwaved a bottle because my 'process' didn't require it, but what's the problem with doing so? I understand it can produce hot spots, but if you shake the bottle the hot spots would dissipate, no? Just like when you stir nuked food. And you'd shake the bottle anyway, wouldn't you?


What am I missing?

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 01-29-2010 - 9:01am

That is why I get annoyed with people being extreme and dogmatic about things like this. What works for one, may not work for another. The idea should be to help and support, not send people screaming for the nearest formula aisle.

Dd was on formula for the first week (in the hospital), and sure enough, she did refuse to nurse when I tried. But I realized it was because the breast was completely engorged and she was getting frustrated that she was not getting any milk out. So, before latching her I used a hand pump for a few minutes to get the let-down going then latched her to a breast spewing milk all over the place. She quickly figured it out. Again, that may not work for all or every time, but not one person suggested it, they just sat there shaking their heads and tut-tutting about her having had bottles. Not very helpful.

~~~~~ o o o ~~~~

Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much.

Oscar Wilde

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