Daycare and infant feeding

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-08-2001
Daycare and infant feeding
98
Tue, 01-26-2010 - 10:22am

Hi! It's been pointed out to me that this board is debating infant feeding, while the Breastmilk vs. Formula board has been debating daycares. I thought I would bring that topic here for discussion.


The questions being asked are this:


Do either BF or FF babies require more overall care at daycare?


Do either BF or FF babies require more one-on-one time at daycare?


Should there be a different fee for daycare for either BF or FF babies?


And another question that's been asked in other threads but I thought

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-10-2009
Tue, 01-26-2010 - 10:34am
Do either BF or FF babies require more overall care at daycare? -- I can't imagine why it would make any difference in the level of care.
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Tue, 01-26-2010 - 10:38am

Do either BF or FF babies require more overall care at daycare? I can't see why that would be the case.

Do either BF or FF babies require more one-on-one time at daycare? Again, I can't see why.

Should there be a different fee for daycare for either BF or FF babies? No.

Should breastmilk in a bottle be handled differently than formula in a bottle? Because breastmilk is essentially raw milk, I imagine more care would need to be taken to make sure it is handled properly. Also, I would think that people would need to be careful because of the possibility of HIV in breastmilk. I don't know very much about that though.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Tue, 01-26-2010 - 10:44am

Babies are different. Some are content with very little human interaction, some need to be carried around a lot; they require a lot of holding and entertaining. Some fall easily into a nap schedule, others do not. Some have a hard time and get fussy while teething, others the first thing you know about them teething is that they have a new tooth. I think the assumption behind the questions here is that one or another -- dealing with a breastfed vs a formula fed infant is more "work," but given the differences among babies, and the fact that feeding isn't the only factor in how difficult or easy a baby is, it would seem sort of silly to base a fee structure on what kind of food a baby is getting.

Some babies poop three times a day, some poop once a week. Maybe they should charge by the dump.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-08-2001
Tue, 01-26-2010 - 10:56am

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That's pretty much my answer too.

Avatar for mommy2amani
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Tue, 01-26-2010 - 11:02am

I had both a FF baby and a BF baby in child care.


Do either BF or FF babies require more overall care at daycare?
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-05-2000
Tue, 01-26-2010 - 11:34am

Do either BF or FF babies require more overall care at daycare?

Do either BF or FF babies require more one-on-one time at daycare?

Should there be a different fee for daycare for either BF or FF babies?

Blanket answer to all 3 questions is no.

Should breastmilk in a bottle be handled differently than formula in a bottle?

Other than breastmilk being stored in the fridge and powdered formula in a can on the counter/cupboard, I can't think of anything.

Chris

The truth may be out there but lies are in your head. Terry Pratchett

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-27-2007
Tue, 01-26-2010 - 2:07pm

more care would need to be taken to make sure it is handled properly. Also, I would think that people would need to be careful because of the possibility of HIV in breastmilk. I don't know very much about that though.


1. I dont send in my milk for daycare providers to drink.


2. If a daycare provider is prepping bottles with an open and actively bleeding wound then they are also putting my child at risk and should be fired immediately.


3. Up to 14% of

              *Praying for my best friend, my Dad*


 &n

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Tue, 01-26-2010 - 2:41pm

Even if the percentage of infection was less than 1%, I would still encourage my daycare providers to take precautions. Also, in my experience, babies spit up, drool, and can just generally get milk from a bottle all over.

In most cases, I imagine cleaning up a nose bleed from a kid with HIV is not going to give you HIV either, but I certainly understand taking precautions when cleaning up nose bleeds in schools as well.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-27-2007
Tue, 01-26-2010 - 3:03pm

Meaning what?


Should they don gloves while feeding infants BM? DO you seriously think that you will contract HIV if a baby spits up on your shoulder?


Ingesting infant spittal is not something that I have done or seen any of my staff do in all the years I have worked in childcare.


I would not hire, as a someone who has ran a centre, a provider who would


1. Handle bottles while actively bleeding.


2. Drink the BM or baby spittal.


3. Be uneducated about HIV to the extent that they would feel the need to go above and beyound the universal precautions we are taught.


Which is not to handle infants/children when they are actively bleeding. To use gloves while administering first aid and changing diapers.


4. Think that baby spit up will infect them with HIV if it gets on thier shoulders, arms, face.


If you are caring for infants with open sores on your body or while actively bleeding then you are more of a danger to them then they are to you.


              *Praying for my best friend, my Dad*


 &n

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Tue, 01-26-2010 - 3:08pm
Meaning, being sure to wash their hands after getting breastmilk or spit up on them. I'm not sure why you are acting as if it is completely unreasonable to point out that HIV is in breastmilk and that people be aware and somewhat cautious of that.

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