Do children need preschool?

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Do children need preschool?
185
Sun, 02-21-2010 - 8:52am
I'm sure some do, but my question is more can a child with a SAHM go without preschool and be successful in pre-K and kindergarten. Say for example a set of twins who have each other all day, and 4 older siblings of various ages who have friends over a lot, and who get some other interaction with similar aged children outside the home for free play a couple of days a week, with an educated mother able to teach the basics of numbers, letters, good behavior, etc. Is preschool a must have for all children, or can a good SAHM skip it? What would a SAHM need to do at home in order to successfully prepare her children for either pre-K or kindergarten without sending the kids to preschool?

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Avatar for mom34101
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Registered: 03-27-2003
Sun, 02-21-2010 - 8:21pm

Pre-K is the preschool program for the year before K, but it's still preschool. I'd agree that preschool for 2-year-olds is different from preschool for 4-year-olds (but to me, that's just developmental--here, kids have to be 2.5 for preschool anyway).

I have one kid who went to pre-K and one who didn't, and I don't see that the one who did got any special benefit from it. It may have made the transition to K easier since it was in the same building, but the kid who went to play-based preschool knew the same stuff as the one who went to pre-K. I suspect the real benefit of pre-K is for disadvantaged kids.

Avatar for mom34101
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Registered: 03-27-2003
Sun, 02-21-2010 - 8:25pm

Agreed. A heck of a lot of people my age never went to preschool, and they did just fine. ;)

Avatar for mom34101
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Registered: 03-27-2003
Sun, 02-21-2010 - 8:27pm
Or find another district. ;) Mastering "a tremendous amount of academic skills" by the end of K sounds like a lot of pressure for a 5-year-old.
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Registered: 04-22-2005
Sun, 02-21-2010 - 8:56pm
What I'm saying is that preschool is general (any year before kindergarten), whereas pre-k is a specific year (the year just before kindergarten).














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Registered: 06-24-2008
Mon, 02-22-2010 - 12:19am

That's how I was using the terms too, but tomato tomahto, sounds like either way it's the same thing.

I thought my plan was a good one, SAH to age 3, then send them to part-time preschool when I did my one year internship, then at 4 yo to go full day pre-k/daycare whatever (I'll be working full time then) and kindy at age 5.

But looking at the limited scheduling options and my upcoming part-time employment being somewhat sporadic (12-15 hours per week, mix of days, evenings and maybe even weekends), it seems to make sense to keep using someone in my home like I do for my evening classes. I remember when my ODD was 3 yo, I WOH with her from infancy, we got a list of things children needed to know for kindy. At 3 yo my ODD knew all of them, and she still had two more years of learning before she had to know them. Although I don't remember what they all were, I'm pretty sure they are simple enough to teach. At 2.5 yo my twins know some letters of the alphabet (their own first initials and their older sisters first initial), most colors, and they are starting to count (usually "1, 2, 6! mommy there are 6!" lol). They also help clean up their toys, can pour from one cup to another with fairly good accuracy, and can sit through story time at the book store (though sitting on my lap, but they are not even 3 yo yet).

If I scrap the 3 yo preschool idea I could still send them to pre-k the following year, or not, depending on if I change my mind again at that point. Anyway, it's good to hear I'm not nuts with this idea I'm having.

"The last of human freedoms - the ability to choose one's attitude in a given set of circumstances." - Viktor Frankl.



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Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Mon, 02-22-2010 - 3:24am
No, I don't think your plan is nuts. Do check what the school will expect at K entrance (and exit), just so you have an idea, but it is hard for me to think that your kids should have a huge problem getting what they need at home.

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Registered: 05-27-1998
Mon, 02-22-2010 - 7:27am

ITA! We moved (for work reasons) to Massachusetts from Texas halfway thru our DD's kindergarten year. I brought her tests and other assessments with us to the new school. Her teacher was appalled by what was expected in the Texas school, a so-called "blue ribbon" school.


There's a reason why schools in Massachusetts are consistently at the top nationwide. The thorough job they do teaching the basics is one of them.

Avatar for mommy2amani
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Registered: 03-26-2003
Mon, 02-22-2010 - 9:10am

It sounds like you have a good plan in place.

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Registered: 06-24-2008
Mon, 02-22-2010 - 10:21am

Ok, I just looked up my school district information about kindergarten. They stress all children are different and they will assess your child's abilities in kindergarten whatever they are. They want children who are preparing for kindergarten to be read to, know how a book works (which page you read first and things like that), have an interest in learning that starts at home (explore the neighborhood, create, draw, paint, etc), know the alphabet, letter sounds (what things in this room start with the "s" sound for example) and be able to spell their first name.

At 2.5 years old they are approx 1/2 way there already, lol.

"The last of human freedoms - the ability to choose one's attitude in a given set of circumstances." - Viktor Frankl.



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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Mon, 02-22-2010 - 10:33am
Or find a private school for the kid where they understand the dynamics of child development a little better.

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