Do children need preschool?

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Do children need preschool?
185
Sun, 02-21-2010 - 8:52am
I'm sure some do, but my question is more can a child with a SAHM go without preschool and be successful in pre-K and kindergarten. Say for example a set of twins who have each other all day, and 4 older siblings of various ages who have friends over a lot, and who get some other interaction with similar aged children outside the home for free play a couple of days a week, with an educated mother able to teach the basics of numbers, letters, good behavior, etc. Is preschool a must have for all children, or can a good SAHM skip it? What would a SAHM need to do at home in order to successfully prepare her children for either pre-K or kindergarten without sending the kids to preschool?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-27-2007
Thu, 02-25-2010 - 6:58pm

Yes children do need preschool. Its very necessary if they are to develop cognitively.


As a Preschool Teacher and Early Childhood Educator, I strongly disagree. Why would a stranger be more able to teach a child then that childs parents?

              *Praying for my best friend, my Dad*


 &n

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-27-2007
Thu, 02-25-2010 - 6:59pm
Take a deep breath and relax hun. You have alot on your plate.

              *Praying for my best friend, my Dad*


 &n

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Thu, 02-25-2010 - 7:05pm
While I do understand that feeling paying for a college education is technically a gift and like any other gift once given it is up to the receiver to do with what they want.
Avatar for mom34101
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Thu, 02-25-2010 - 8:27pm
Of course. The "kid" in question is now in her 30s and had a full scholarship to Harvard (it was grad school), so it's certainly up to her what she does with it. I still think it's ironic.
Avatar for mom34101
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Thu, 02-25-2010 - 8:30pm
My niece would love to go to CIA.
Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 02-26-2010 - 2:06am
That wouldn't bother me. I don't see the connection between my paying for an education and then what job the kid eventually decides to do.

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“Wise men speak because they have something to say; Fools because they have to say something.”

Plato

Avatar for mom34101
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Fri, 02-26-2010 - 8:38am
I believe in education for education's sake, but I don't see the mystique of Harvard.
Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 02-26-2010 - 9:23am
Well, no, I am no Harvard snob either, but aren't most top tier schools about the same cost as ole Ha'va'd? IOW, it would not matter to me if the kid went to the local CC, Stanford or Harvard in relation to eventual occupation.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

“Wise men speak because they have something to say; Fools because they have to say something.”

Plato

Avatar for mom34101
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Fri, 02-26-2010 - 9:55am

I'm not against name schools (I went to a top ten law school, and that's definitely been an advantage to me career-wise), but I've seen people spend money on expensive schools for the wrong reasons. I think a lot of what you get from the ivies is contacts (which imo isn't worth the money if what you really want is to become a chef). I've seen people spend money on expensive private school (is that an oxymoron) and end up paying off loans for years, discouraging or precluding them from going to grad school.

There are excellent public schools out there, as well as private schools that are in a better position to give scholarship money. My nephew is in the college decision process right now, and surprisingly (his parents make good money), he's getting scholarship money at almost all the private schools he's looking at (no ivies) that will cut down the cost considerably. He's also considering a couple of out-of-state public schools, at least one of which has reciprocity with his state (so he gets in-state tuition).

If the parents have unlimited funds to spend and are paying for both college and grad school, then I'd say the kid might as well go to the "best" school she can get into. I just wouldn't start from the proposition that the ivies are the "best." I"d be looking at what are the best schools for the child's interests.

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 02-26-2010 - 10:05am

We do not disagree really. All I meant is that which school my kid went to would not color my opinion about an eventual career in pastry-making.

Personally I would not spend the money for a BA at any super-expensive school, ivy or otherwise, unless there was some extremely good and specific reason to do so. I can see shelling out the big bucks for a name law school, other professional school or even grad school more generally. But at the BA level, spending that kind of money seems wanton.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

“Wise men speak because they have something to say; Fools because they have to say something.”

Plato

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