Do children need preschool?

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Do children need preschool?
185
Sun, 02-21-2010 - 8:52am
I'm sure some do, but my question is more can a child with a SAHM go without preschool and be successful in pre-K and kindergarten. Say for example a set of twins who have each other all day, and 4 older siblings of various ages who have friends over a lot, and who get some other interaction with similar aged children outside the home for free play a couple of days a week, with an educated mother able to teach the basics of numbers, letters, good behavior, etc. Is preschool a must have for all children, or can a good SAHM skip it? What would a SAHM need to do at home in order to successfully prepare her children for either pre-K or kindergarten without sending the kids to preschool?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Sun, 02-28-2010 - 2:26pm
The schools that aren't rated either don't report their test scores to the state or don't have enough students in the school taking standardized tests to get the data GreatSchool requires to rate the schools.
Avatar for mom34101
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sun, 02-28-2010 - 9:04pm
For sure, if you get grad school funded, that would be different. Most people I know don't have that option though.
Avatar for mom34101
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sun, 02-28-2010 - 9:22pm

We have ECE here beginning at age 3 in the public schools. It's probably more structured than a regular preschool, but the kids are doing centers and play-based learning rather than a "curriculum" just like many preschools. If the teacher is sick, they have to have a sub, but the same thing happens at regular preschools.

To me, it's not "school" just because it's in a school building. There's no requirement that kids attend pre-K, and many don't. If it someday becomes a requirement, or virtually everybody sends their kids (like K), then I'll think of it as "school."

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Sun, 02-28-2010 - 10:08pm
I always tell undergrads who want to go to grad school that if they DON'T get their grad school funded, they should not even think about going to grad school. Professional schools -- law, medicine, veterinary medicine, architecture, etc, are a whole different matter, but nobody should be paying his or her own way through a humanities, social science, hard sciences grad program. Academia is a brutally competitive field, and if you are not getting funded for an MA or PhD in a humanities, etc field, you have already lost the first round of competition and you are just going to get frustrated and deeper in debt. I won't even take grad students my department won't fund.
Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Mon, 03-01-2010 - 2:02am

I would still really like you to clarify what you mean by this:

"there are some families at preschool whose parents don't want them learning english, the culture thing that's so important"

If the kids are going to preschool, how are the parents showing that they do not want their kids to learn English?

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Avatar for mom34101
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Mon, 03-01-2010 - 10:17am
Yeah, that makes sense. That's why our perspectives on this are so different.
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Mon, 03-01-2010 - 2:09pm

Would they be allowed to see the type of data needed though?

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Mon, 03-01-2010 - 2:13pm

In our local public school, preschool or prek is part of the school district, as is the case with many other districts in the area...but just like kindergarten, it's optional and can be fee based.


Edited to add:

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2007
Mon, 03-01-2010 - 2:29pm

I don't think any individual data would be used, just over all data.

I don't remember it being a huge deal to get it. Perhaps our state requires most of it anyway and it is easy to package it up for the evaluation. I don't know.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2000
Mon, 03-01-2010 - 5:03pm

Yes, that is exactly the way I look at it. Here, some elementary schools have pre-K but it is need-based. Aside from the need-based kids, the bulk of kids go to privately run/church based preschool programs. The preschool that my kids have all gone to offers both a pre-K curriculum or a 4's curriculum for the year before kindergarten. In years' past, the pre-K was limited to kids who had late birthdays and missed the deadline for kindergarten, but had already gone through the 4's curriculum. Pre-K is a 5-day program vs the 4s class which is only 3 days. However, once the schools here went to mandatory full day kindergarten, more and more parents started requesting the pre-K class as a way to slowly prepare their kids for the transition to an all-day class so they added more pre-K classes and dropped most of the 4s classes. Most kids now, regardless of their age (they have to be 4 y/o by the start of school, but it's no longer mostly kids with late birthdays), enter the pre-K program at our school.

In any case, to me it is definitely not "school" in the sense that it is not mandatory and not part of a regular elementary school day. And it is still play-based like the 2s, 3s and 4s classes.

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