Do children need preschool?

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Do children need preschool?
185
Sun, 02-21-2010 - 8:52am
I'm sure some do, but my question is more can a child with a SAHM go without preschool and be successful in pre-K and kindergarten. Say for example a set of twins who have each other all day, and 4 older siblings of various ages who have friends over a lot, and who get some other interaction with similar aged children outside the home for free play a couple of days a week, with an educated mother able to teach the basics of numbers, letters, good behavior, etc. Is preschool a must have for all children, or can a good SAHM skip it? What would a SAHM need to do at home in order to successfully prepare her children for either pre-K or kindergarten without sending the kids to preschool?

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Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Sun, 02-21-2010 - 9:05am
I am sure SAHM kids can do fine in K and onwards without having gone to preschool. If I were to do it, I would probably look for some other group setting where my kids could learn to follow directions, not given by mom or dad, and operate in a group. Some kind of Sunday school might do, or even a regular babysitting exchange with a friend or neighbor.

**** ^^^ ****
You can do the work of the mind without your hands,
but not that of the hand without your mind.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Sun, 02-21-2010 - 9:16am

"but my question is more can a child with a SAHM go without preschool and be successful in pre-K and kindergarten."

Sure, my DD1 had no schooling prior to kindergarten. DD2 and DD3 had limited nursery school (more like a MDO program than a pre-school program, the emphasis on playing not education). I think one did it 2 day a week for one school semester and the other for 2 school semesters. All had no problem in kindergarten.

"What would a SAHM need to do at home in order to successfully prepare her children for either pre-K or kindergarten without sending the kids to preschool?"

I don't feel I did anything special the only organized activity DD1 had was story time at the library. DD2 and DD3 also did story time and spent some time in daycare. They did know the basics before starting school, counting, colors, ABC, writing their name etc. But they learned those as part of living not as scheduled lessons taught to them.




Edited 2/21/2010 9:20 am ET by emptynester2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-13-2009
Sun, 02-21-2010 - 10:38am

Of course a child can do well in Kindy without going to preschool.

Christine
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009
Sun, 02-21-2010 - 11:07am

I would imagine it depends on the SAHM. I mean if we're talking average rank and file SAHM? yeah, sure, I would imagine a kid would do fine without pre-school.

but if the SAHM is uneducated, an immigrant, or has problems such as drug or alcohol addiction or a just plain horrid neglectful Mom, then I can see preschool being quite valuable.

I think for the vast majority of SAHMs, however, the "need" for preschool is exaggerated.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Sun, 02-21-2010 - 11:56am

no child NEEDS preschool.


What would a SAHM need to do at home in order to successfully prepare her children for either pre-K or kindergarten without sending the kids to preschool?


your advantages AH mean alot in and of itself.

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Sun, 02-21-2010 - 12:24pm

I'm sure a good SAHM can do it. Teach them the basics that you mentioned (letters, letter sounds, numbers, good behavior) and give them lots of practice engaging in structured activity time so that the idea of sitting down to a certain task at a certain time isn't new to them. My local library has once a week "Toddler Time" and other programs for different age groups. That sort of thing would be a nice way for them to become familiar to listening to someone other than Mom for sustained periods of time.

I've also heard good things about Brightly Beaming Resources: http://www.letteroftheweek.com/

Find out what your schools would be teaching in Kindergarten so that you'll know where your children's skills should be by the time they enter.















Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Sun, 02-21-2010 - 12:33pm

LOL, yes, well said,

"and don't bite others on a regular basis, they'll do great no matter what."

**** ^^^ ****
You can do the work of the mind without your hands,
but not that of the hand without your mind.

Danish proverb

Avatar for mom34101
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sun, 02-21-2010 - 2:44pm

First of all, pre-K *is* preschool.

As to your question, kids don't *need* preschool to be prepared for K. If a parent is concerned about academics for preschoolers (which personally, I don't believe in), a sahm would be in a better position to do that anyway by virtue of being able to give more individualized attention. If a parent is concerned about learning how to line up and follow "school rules," kids can learn that in pre-K or K. As for socialization, the kind that happens in a group setting is only one kind of socialization. But if that is important, it's easy enough to provide through playgroups, getting together with friends, going places there are other kids (the park, story time, etc.). And it can certainly be provided through a year of pre-K--that's what pre-K is for.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Sun, 02-21-2010 - 4:23pm

The terms are used interchangeably, but there is a slight difference between preschool and pre-k.

http://www.preknow.org/resource/abc/prekvspreschool.cfm

My 2-year-old son is in preschool. He won't be old enough for pre-k for another couple of years.















iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Sun, 02-21-2010 - 5:41pm

I agree with this, and want to add to the list: if the child is in a tremendously competitive district in which the children are expected to master a great number of academic skills by the end of kindy, then I'd strongly suggest sending him to preschool first.

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