Do women or men make better bosses?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 11-13-2008
Do women or men make better bosses?
165
Tue, 03-19-2013 - 4:10pm

I realize you can't generalize when it comes to gender, you can find good and bad in both of them.  I was just curious what everyone's experiences have been when it comes to management, if you've have a better experience with a man versus a woman.   

In your experience, who have been the better bosses?  Did your experiences differ when it came to the position you were in, the career path you were on, or whether you had children at the time or were childless?  

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iVillage Member
Registered: 11-22-2000
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 5:08pm

geschichtsgal wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">cruisingchick20111</em> wrote:</div>Yes Jam I agree, bosses jobs are not supposed to worry about what you need to do outside of work but to make sure the work is getting done for that job.</blockquote></p><p>Good bosses understand though when outside of work stuff comes up occasionally, especially if the person is an overall excellent employee.</p>

One of the best things a new employer has ever said to me was, "We do understand that you have a life, and that sometimes that means you will have to be away from work." 


iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2010
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 5:08pm

cruisingchick20111 wrote:
But you have made that choice Lauren to accept that for 6 1/2 years. You really can not complain then that it is nearly impossible to maintain that kind of schedule and maintain a home at the same time.

She can't?  There's some kind of law against whether she can complain or not or do you just get to decide who should be able to complain about which topics?  Even if there is it doesn't matter--I told Lauren just last week that she is allowed to complain whenever she wants to, so please refrain from telling her that they can't complain.  

“Clearly," said Arthur,"you're an idiot- but you're our kind of idiot. Come on.” 
― Markus ZusakThe Book Thief

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-22-2000
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 5:06pm

OK, then.  I won't.  I'll pretend that it's easy to do everything singlehandedly and to do 2 jobs singlehandedly, just so that you won't think i'm whining. @@  It is impossible to do both, though. 

For the record, this wasn't exactly a choice.  The second job was sprung on me and is supposed to be temporary.  I could look for another job except that a) I don't have time since I'm here so much and when I'm not, I am trying to get things under control at home; and b) I like my job, I genuinely love the firm I work for and I don't want to work somewhere else.  It has just been far more demanding of my time than is really healthy.

My situation is actually quite common in the field in which I work.  Very strict deadlines with very short lead times are the norm, and I actually work far less than most people in my industry.  It's a pretty common theme among single people who work in these jobs that their life is pretty much reduced to just work and the people who have other people taking care of things at home don't understand why it's a problem. 


iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 5:04pm

cruisingchick20111 wrote:
Yes Jam I agree, bosses jobs are not supposed to worry about what you need to do outside of work but to make sure the work is getting done for that job.

Good bosses understand though when outside of work stuff comes up occasionally, especially if the person is an overall excellent employee.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-10-2011
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 4:58pm
Flexible how?
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 4:56pm

cruisingchick20111 wrote:
I have found the same Melissa that men or women who are married and/or have children understand more about your life outside of work being married and having children. I work with a lot of single and/or women who have no kids. I work with 16 people in my branched off dept (15 women, one male) and only 3 of us have children. 7 are married.

I was pregnant when I interviewed for my job.  I told my now department head before the interview and said that I was still very interested in the position.  I was super nervous.  She kind of laughed and said that she had also been pregnant when she applied for one of her first professional positions.  She has been great about understanding when I need to take of work due to snow days and kid sick days.  Of the people I work with, very few of them have kids, and if they do, they usually only have one, and that kid is usually already grown up.  I work with a lot of people much older than myself.

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-14-2011
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 4:56pm
That's part of being flexible. Again, the only one here that is talking about a special assignment or project is you.
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-10-2011
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 4:52pm
I never said eighty hours all the time but maybe an hour more a day to finish things outside of the normal work load. I have done this many of times in my 18 years. Stayed a few hours, worked a half Saturday. It had to be done as that is the nature of the business I am in. If 60-80 hours a week were being worked by an individual, then yes, we would hire a temp or someone else to help out.
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-10-2011
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 4:48pm
But you have made that choice Lauren to accept that for 6 1/2 years. You really can not complain then that it is nearly impossible to maintain that kind of schedule and maintain a home at the same time.
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 4:40pm

lifespeachy wrote:
This isn't about an assignment. It's about overall work load and job performance, and a long term home/worklife balance that benefits the employer AND the employee.

One of the best things about where my DH works is how family friendly they are. No one is allowed to work overtime unless completely unavoidable.   Their thinking if "Do you 40 hours and go home,  if you cannot do your work in 40 hours than we have given you too much work  and need to hire more people".  Since DH works in IT there are some times when he does have to work weekends either becuase something breaks down or routine maintenance that has to be done when things are closed down but when he does he gets comp time to make up for it rather than over time.  The only exception is when it happens at the end of a month.  They are paid monthly so hours worked in one month cannot be balanced out in comp time the following month.

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