Do women or men make better bosses?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 11-13-2008
Do women or men make better bosses?
165
Tue, 03-19-2013 - 4:10pm

I realize you can't generalize when it comes to gender, you can find good and bad in both of them.  I was just curious what everyone's experiences have been when it comes to management, if you've have a better experience with a man versus a woman.   

In your experience, who have been the better bosses?  Did your experiences differ when it came to the position you were in, the career path you were on, or whether you had children at the time or were childless?  

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 3:50pm

lifespeachy wrote:
Yep, you did. When asked to define "manly" you stated, "Someone who doesn't cry in public, portraits a strong demeanor." I then asked, "In other words, someone who acts professionally?" Your response was yes. So, according to your definition, manly = proffesional.

I'm confused.  She also said that she's only seen one person cry in public, a female.  And that women are more emotional than men.  So one woman in 25 years of employment cries, and that translates to "women in general are more emotional than men?"   Am I getting this anywhere near right?

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-14-2011
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 3:51pm
So why do you keep bringing up crying?
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-10-2011
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 3:51pm
Yes they should care about their employees but their first goal is to make sure the job at hand is done and if that means they have to have their employees work longer hours to get it done (and them not being able to do household chores), that is what is first priority. I can't imagine having a big project to do and whining about how I have to go and mop and can't get it done because I am here at work. lol.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 3:53pm

cruisingchick20111 wrote:
No, I don't think crying is a bad thing (you haven't seen my husband watching movies lololol) but I think when you are at a job (especially if you are supervising others), you need to be as professional as you can. A women crying is seen to many men as them being weak and not being able to do their job as they can't handle the stress.

But you said that you only saw one woman cry.  Did that make her unable to do her job? Have you never seen a man under severe pressure from stress? I have.  Sometimes it isn't pretty, even if he doesn't cry.

Stress happens in almost every job, and some people handle it professionally, and some people do not.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-10-2011
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 3:53pm
"Crying at work is something both men and women do, though not equally. Women cry, on average, four times as often as men—according to University of Minnesota neurologist William Frey, an average of 5.3 times per month, compared with 1.4 times for men. This isn't just a function of cultural training—women actually produce far more prolactin, the hormone responsible for milk production that also controls the neurotransmitter receptors in our tear glands. Women’s tear ducts are also anatomically different from male tear ducts, resulting in a larger volume of tears. A propensity to cry is, in part, biologically driven."
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-14-2011
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 3:54pm
Do you work 70+ hours a week, on a regular basis?
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-14-2011
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 3:55pm
Why are you posting quotes about women crying? Is this relevent to the debate?
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-10-2011
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 3:56pm
Nope, I work 37.5 hours and never said I did work 70+ hours but if I did, I can't blame my boss for my housework and errands not being able to get done. I chose that job (70 + hours) and if I didn't think I could handle the excess hours and my outside life, I would have to find another job.
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-14-2011
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 4:01pm
Well, if those are the choices that you have, then you should consider yourself lucky.
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 4:03pm

cruisingchick20111 wrote:
Yes Jam I agree, bosses jobs are not supposed to worry about what you need to do outside of work but to make sure the work is getting done for that job.

As a manager, I do worry about what my employees need to do outside of work. Achieving work-life balance makes the employee more productive, IME. My team is highly professional and not easily replaceble and I would never treat them as commodity laborers.

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