Do women or men make better bosses?

Avatar for Cmmelissa
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-13-2008
Do women or men make better bosses?
165
Tue, 03-19-2013 - 4:10pm

I realize you can't generalize when it comes to gender, you can find good and bad in both of them.  I was just curious what everyone's experiences have been when it comes to management, if you've have a better experience with a man versus a woman.   

In your experience, who have been the better bosses?  Did your experiences differ when it came to the position you were in, the career path you were on, or whether you had children at the time or were childless?  

Pages

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 4:04pm

cruisingchick20111 wrote:
"Crying at work is something both men and women do, though not equally. Women cry, on average, four times as often as men—according to University of Minnesota neurologist William Frey, an average of 5.3 times per month, compared with 1.4 times for men. This isn't just a function of cultural training—women actually produce far more prolactin, the hormone responsible for milk production that also controls the neurotransmitter receptors in our tear glands. Women’s tear ducts are also anatomically different from male tear ducts, resulting in a larger volume of tears. A propensity to cry is, in part, biologically driven."

Wow.  I haven't cried in about seven years.  I must be some sort of biological wonder.  But aside from that, isn't there a difference between crying and crying in public.  As I said, I have only seen two colleagues break down in tears in public in my current position.  One man, one woman.  Neither of them came off as particularly professional during the outburst.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-10-2011
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 4:06pm
I do consider myself VERY blessed for my work schedule. Also for my dh's who is able to run many errands, do housework and cook dinner for us. I am aware that others don't have that type of job though. I have friends who work those hours and at one time, my dh was working 60 hours a week. Their bosses can't make it their priority to worry about their errands though.
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-22-2000
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 4:09pm

I didn't say he's a bad boss; I said he doesn't always understand that my personal time has different demands on it than his does. He envisions my time off more like his...which it isn't, partly because the stuff I have to do when I get home isn't something he has to think about. 

He also doesn't have a SAHW...just one who works less than he does. 


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-10-2011
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 4:10pm
Chest--So if your boss had an assignment that you need to give to your employees, will you tell him/her that they can't do it because they didn't get their food shopping done that week?
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-10-2011
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 4:16pm
But a boss is not really interested in getting in depth with how anyone's personal time has different demands than their own. While if it is something that can't be avoided (an illness of a worker or a worker's family, etc), they are not there to worry if they should ask you to stay a few more hours because you need to do your laundry.
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-14-2011
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 4:18pm
This isn't about an assignment. It's about overall work load and job performance, and a long term home/worklife balance that benefits the employer AND the employee.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 4:19pm

cruisingchick20111 wrote:
I do consider myself VERY blessed for my work schedule. Also for my dh's who is able to run many errands, do housework and cook dinner for us. I am aware that others don't have that type of job though. I have friends who work those hours and at one time, my dh was working 60 hours a week. Their bosses can't make it their priority to worry about their errands though.

Bosses who don't worry about work/life balance for their employees often find themselves in the position of having to find new employees.  I suppose in some fields, it doesn't matter.  It costs us about 10K to run a search for a new colleague, so we'd rather not do it if we don't have to.  Plus, if we have to hire at the entry level, it's often years before we are getting the same "work" out of a new employee than out of a seasoned one.

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-22-2000
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 4:20pm

cruisingchick20111 wrote:
Yes they should care about their employees but their first goal is to make sure the job at hand is done and if that means they have to have their employees work longer hours to get it done (and them not being able to do household chores), that is what is first priority. I can't imagine having a big project to do and whining about how I have to go and mop and can't get it done because I am here at work. lol.

That statement shows exactly how little you know about the situation.  Which is fine....IMO, the less you know the better...but you may want to restrict your judgements to things you actually know something about.  And I'm not just talking about things that have to do with me.


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-10-2011
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 4:21pm
I was speaking in general Lauren as yes, I don't know about how your job works.
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Thu, 03-21-2013 - 4:24pm

I make sure my employees have work-life balance, and they have assignments and responsibilities that can typically be done in a usual work week . I do not micromanage their time. If they have to run out to shop, they are professional enough to get their work done often outside of the typical 9-5 workday. If they are assigned a last minute assignment that needs immediate completion, they are professional enough to prioritize it to get it done. If I constantly gave them such assignments, (1) my management skills obviously suck (2) they would move on to a different position because they are in high demand.

Pages