Does money matter when raising children,

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-22-2009
Does money matter when raising children,
869
Tue, 02-15-2011 - 10:02am

Do you feel a parents income has a direct EFFECT on the children they raise,

Pages

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-22-2009
Tue, 02-15-2011 - 8:23pm

I think education

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Tue, 02-15-2011 - 8:27pm
I don't think that Disney vacations are necessary to bring up a well rounded child-- or even that Disney *in particular* has a direct effect on the kind of adults/people they become. I also think that lower income parents can make up for some of disadvantages related to having a lower income if they work hard at it.

But, think of parents (like mine) who drag their kids to every historical site within few days travel (Gettysburg, Monticello, Williamsburg, Little House on the Prairie sites, Mount Rushmore, etc). I have to think that has had an effect on me. Heck, I even ended up majoring in history. Would I had have done the same thing if we had not traveled? I won't know, but I kind of doubt it.

And also-- college funding. If you are a smart kid from a low income area, you might get a scholarship. If you are an average kid from a low income area, chances are you are screwed. If you are a smart kid from a high income area, your parents can pay and/or you might get a scholarship. If you are an average kid from a high income area, your parents can pay.

And then after college. Let's say kid goes to college, but takes out loans. That limits what jobs that kid can take after graduating. If you know you are going to have x amount of loan repayments, you probably wouldn't be able to take an unpaid internship, for example.

All other things being equal, I think lower income kids (who have just their basic needs taken care of) can do really well, if they work really hard-- but they have to work a hell of a lot harder than a wealthy kid has to for the same opportunities.
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-08-2008
Tue, 02-15-2011 - 9:18pm

All other things being equal, I think lower income kids (who have just their basic needs taken care of) can do really well, if they work really hard-- but they have to work a hell of a lot harder than a wealthy kid has to for the same opportunities.

ITA with you.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Tue, 02-15-2011 - 10:05pm


But isn't that the definition of "all things not being equal"?

Do you (universal you) think that there are more poor bootstrapped people do better than those privileged children?

Because statistics show high SES children do exponentially better than lower SES doesn't just mean a burden, it's a huge inequity that society must help overcome (IMO).
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Wed, 02-16-2011 - 12:29am

I agree. The emphasis in that sentence was supposed to be on the last part-- "but they have to work a hell of a lot harder than a wealthy kid has to for the same opportunities." Maybe I should have added and they might still not be within reach . . .

Maybe a better way to say it is "While it's not impossible for poor kids to pull themselves up by their bootstraps, it's unlikely."

I think there are a lucky few poor kids who do well, who then say "Well, anyone can do it." Or like people point to Bill Gates as a good example why a college degree is necessary while ignoring the statistics that show that people with college degrees earn on average more than those who do not have college degrees.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009
Wed, 02-16-2011 - 5:17am

To the extent that it's largely impossible to raise (feed/clothe/educate/house/provide appropriate medical care) without money, yes money matters.

Now, whether that money is obtained through one income or two, that doesn't matter.

************

Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009
Wed, 02-16-2011 - 5:19am

************

Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-04-2003
Wed, 02-16-2011 - 6:31am

I think when you are raising a special needs kids you see people around you that take for granted things like a smile, interaction with other children and the ability to be in a crowded place.

After you spend years with a child who can't do those "simple"

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-22-2009
Wed, 02-16-2011 - 7:57am
ITA with you about her child, what i do not agree with her on is her statement about disney and ALL children and the effect on ALL children.
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-22-2009
Wed, 02-16-2011 - 7:57am
I know her, im use to her, and yes i chuckled inside.

Pages