Girls

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-02-2003
Girls
48
Thu, 09-25-2008 - 11:24pm

I would like to hear your thoughts on this topic - in our town - and I do not in anyway think we are unique. There are girls - who are fully capable young women - who have recently had babies. These girls are the one and two years out of school girls - all who did not leave school with a plan. None are married and only one is really in a committed relationship with the father of the baby. I have contended in more than one research paper for school that girl's sometimes get pregnant because they want their future to pick them instead of actually chasing their own dreams or making a real decision about their futures. Think about this as the range of social issues that go into this.


What are your thooughts about this? let's not do the right or wrong thing - and I don't think this is only about girls (lol cleary they are having sex with someone) I think the boys give up on themselves. So, how do we teach our children to believe in thier dreams and be willing to take action on them?

Courtney


You may say I'm a dreamer, but I'm not the only one. I hope some day you'll join us....


Courtney

There's a great big beautiful tomorrow shining at the end of every day... there's a great big beautiful tom

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
In reply to: court527
Tue, 10-07-2008 - 4:13pm
i don't believe it's a high school's responsibility to teach social graces.

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-02-2003
In reply to: court527
Mon, 10-06-2008 - 11:57pm

I think it is part of what all students should learn in high school. We should all leave with the social graces to do well in the world. Not all kids will get it at home because their parents may miss them - that does not mean they shouldn't get the lesson. I believe these skills are actually on our states list of standards which all kids should leave high school knowing.


In the ideal world kids all have good parents who care and support them into adulthood. The reality I see in our SMALL high school (<400 students) is a number of kids who are homeless - last year there were six in the senior class, this year I think I have noted four - and those are only the known ones. There are also kids who have to live with their parents dramas or have medical challenges etc... so yes in an ideal world kids learn these skills by the positive social example learned from happy parents. Sadly, the reality is very different.

Courtney


You may say I'm a dreamer, but I'm not the only one. I hope some day you'll join us....


Courtney

There's a great big beautiful tomorrow shining at the end of every day... there's a great big beautiful tom

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-20-2001
In reply to: court527
Sun, 10-05-2008 - 8:09pm

I don't think

 

Linda - wife, mother, grandmum                     &nb

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
In reply to: court527
Sat, 10-04-2008 - 9:05pm
Don't laugh, but I suggested to my 13 year old that she think about doing a resume. Right now, she just babysits, but next summer, she'll be old enough to work at the library (her current dream job) and she'll be competing with a lot of her friends, who all think the job is about sitting at the desk reading and occasionally looking up and saying, "Which account, please?"
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
In reply to: court527
Fri, 10-03-2008 - 8:29pm
i agree that common principles or the bulk of htat like a handshake,manners,etiquette and even interview skills s/b learned at home and through experience.

i remember turning 16 and being coached by my dad how to get a job.

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
In reply to: court527
Fri, 10-03-2008 - 12:33pm

But it's not the job of high schools to teach kids about handshakes, budgets and interview skills. That's just basic manners and personal responsibility training, and it should be done by parents. Sure, high schools can help kids refine those skills, but the bulk of the training should have been done at home.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
In reply to: court527
Thu, 10-02-2008 - 8:55am
ITA. When people say "kids are being pushed to grow up too fast" the specifics
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-18-2005
In reply to: court527
Thu, 10-02-2008 - 8:23am

I think we have 10 y.o. girls who we try to turn into teenagers and teenagers we want to keep young.


My dd is in 5th grade. There are already girls "dating" boys. That is ridiculous. My dd still plays with her American Girl dolls and school.


I am not in a rush to have her grow up. But, I do make her more responsible for certain things. I am tlakniog about money, chores, schoolwork, etc. I hold her more accountable than I do my 7 y.o.


However, on the flip side, I see parents giving their teenagers expensive gadgets for no reason at all. They do not have jobs or save their money. It is just given to them. That is wrong also.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-05-2000
In reply to: court527
Wed, 10-01-2008 - 11:08am

I think that we are using the phrase "grow up" differently while still saying the same thing. I'm using it in the sense of "oh, grow up!". Think Peter Pan, the boy who refused to grow up because he didn't want the responsibilities of being an adult. One can grow up in terms of birthdays but not necessarily become an adult.

Chris

The truth may be out there but lies are in your head. Terry Pratchett

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-21-2008
In reply to: court527
Tue, 09-30-2008 - 10:53pm

Princesses and "happily ever after" belong to childhood and not in the realm of adults. And I wouldn't call celebrities role models for adult behavior. Same for what is portrayed by the media.


that was my point.

 

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