High School Post-secondary option???

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-23-2003
High School Post-secondary option???
82
Tue, 01-15-2008 - 10:33am

When I was in high school during my junior and senior year because I was on track for the college prep diploma I was eligible to take 1 class per semester at the local university for free.

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Avatar for mkatherine
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Tue, 01-15-2008 - 1:38pm

I think that what I would hope for Liza is that even if her chosen course of study or career did not involve the liberal arts that the foundation I've tried to give her woudl provide her with ways to have literature, philosophy, art, music, poetry, theater etc.. in her life even if she never 'studied' them.

 

Yes. We. Did.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-23-2003
Tue, 01-15-2008 - 1:43pm

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-08-2006
Tue, 01-15-2008 - 2:06pm
You can do both, I have a Masters in English Lit, Library Science, and Computer Science.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-12-2004
Tue, 01-15-2008 - 2:49pm

It is not just parents who

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-23-2003
Tue, 01-15-2008 - 3:04pm

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Wed, 01-16-2008 - 5:02am

I do not have a problem with kids having the opportunity to specialize to some extent while still in HS. If you want to change direction, you always can.

Dd wants to study some kind of science. It will absolutely kill her dad, but he will deal. I do not mind (and I do not think it is really my place to mind either), but it does make me more mindful of pushing humanities/general knowledge while she is still in HS, making sure we travel more, insisting on the foreign languages, involving her in political discussions and so on. Dd will most likely go to U in Europe and that means she will get no core curriculum in college, just straight whatever she chooses to study.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Wed, 01-16-2008 - 5:14am
Lemme try: There are two rough cuts of degrees, one being "liberal arts" vs "professional," the other being "humanities" vs "science." An engineering degree is a professional science degree. A degree in physics is a liberal arts degree in science. A degree in chemistry would equally be a liberal arts degree, but one in pharmacology (leading to becoming a pharmacist) would not be. The confusion may be that many people think "liberal arts" is the same as "humanities" but it is not. That may also be because most humanities degrees do not have direct professional applications, whereas many science or science-related ones do.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Wed, 01-16-2008 - 5:16am
Not shunned, but if you want your kid to have a liberal arts degree, you would probably try to steer said child away from engineering, yes.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Wed, 01-16-2008 - 5:19am
OK, some grounding in basic humanities subjects is not something my kid has the option of skipping on the grounds that she "does not enjoy it." However, since I do not think I can tell an adult what to do, I have made sure she is in a HS where she has no choice but to do Ancient Greek and history, for example.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Wed, 01-16-2008 - 5:23am
LOL, I took calc I as an elective in college, but I do not hate math and my parents had nothing to do with my college education. It bummed me out though that it did not count towards the math requirement of the core.

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