How do moms make money at part-time?

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
How do moms make money at part-time?
60
Mon, 05-06-2013 - 2:20pm

Questions: Is it financially meaningful to work part-time, especially some of the time from home, if kids are home with mom after school dismissal and summer/vacations.  If you presently work full-time but had to work mostly from your home office for a long term, to meet the needs of your family or your health, does your employer/home life allow for that?  And for how long?  "Forever"?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2013
Mon, 05-06-2013 - 7:47pm

Isn't a problem with wah a likely decrease in pay?  At your job, do employees wah? 

Yes, some do but most don't do it every day. Their pay is the same.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Mon, 05-06-2013 - 10:01pm

<<Good point ~  I think it's the wah which makes me wonder how it can be financially worthwhile to mom or to the employer.  I don't think moms would do it unless they got some money.  Since I see them often even before school dismissal, I wonder how valuable their work product can be to an employer.  Some, I just assume are working part-time.>>

Again it depends on the job, I know a few wahms and it seems to be financially worthwhile for their family.  I would think the work product is valuable if they allow their employees to work part time, otherwise, wouldn't they make a change.  You never answered in the other thread about working, what is your background here, some of the comments that you showed that you clearly were missing the target on a number of issues, perhaps your thinking (and assumptions) are also off base on part time employment.


PumpkinAngel

Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Tue, 05-07-2013 - 3:51am
"but it is quite common today." ------------ Yes, I think both PT and WAH options are becoming more and more common. I met a guy who WAHed PT from his soybean farm in the Midwest somewhere. His company had offices on both coasts, but not anywhere near where he was. One of my SILs in Denmark is a lawyer and initially (before kids) worked for an upscale, establishment law firm. She quit to have kids, because back then the hours were too crazy for childrearing, and her husband also had a demanding job (in house lawyer). At some point they were stationed abroad for his job for a few years too, something that was good for his career, but not compatible with her continuing hers. Ten years and 3 kids later, her old firm begged her to come back any which way she could see fit, including WAH and PT and she went back to work. Because of the crazy hours and work conditions, it is becoming harder and harder to recruit and keep young lawyers (as well as doctors, btw) and employers are having to adjust accordingly.
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Tue, 05-07-2013 - 7:28am

chestnuthooligan wrote:
  Manager in software development and consulting. I was one of the first in my company to go pt and wah, but it is quite common today. </p>

Nice.  That sounds like it lends itself easily to wah. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Tue, 05-07-2013 - 7:38am

pumpkinangel wrote:
  Again it depends on the job, I know a few wahms and it seems to be financially worthwhile for their family.  I would think the work product is valuable if they allow their employees to work part time, otherwise, wouldn't they make a change.  You never answered in the other thread about working, what is your background here, some of the comments that you showed that you clearly were missing the target on a number of issues, perhaps your thinking (and assumptions) are also off base on part time employment.</span></p><p><span><br /></span></p>

Working is not that complicated.  I generally don't respond to repetitive posts or posts clearly meant to insult.  I find the ignorance on this board about working long, hard hours for top pay and bennies without even the time to post on these boards to be something you can ask me about.  But if there's something meaningful about working a job which "allows" for a lot of time wasted on the internet, I'll try my best.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Tue, 05-07-2013 - 8:22am

Changing the answer a bit, but thinking back to the women I know who went part time when their kids were small, and realizing it wasn't always about the money. I had one friend who probably preferred not to work at all but who worked some minimum number of hours a year to keep her certification current. I think it was 160 hrs a year. She's a physical/occupational therapist. I have another friend who was a tax attorney who ended up teaching accounting classes at the local junior college two nights a week because she just needed the intellectual stimulation. Our JC pays something like $1200 a class a semester, so she wasn't doing it for the money. I have another friend who quit a job as a music teacher but opened a piano/flute studio and gave private lessons. She went back to work eventually as a part time music teacher at a rural school here but my guess is she's making more $$$ now as a private teacher in her own home. Her kids are the same age as mine.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Tue, 05-07-2013 - 8:29am

bordwithyou wrote:
Changing the answer a bit, but thinking back to the women I know who went part time when their kids were small, and realizing it wasn't always about the money. I had one friend who probably preferred not to work at all but who worked some minimum number of hours a year to keep her certification current. I think it was 160 hrs a year. She's a physical/occupational therapist. I have another who was a tax attorney who ended up teaching accounting classes at the local junior college two nights a week because she just needed the intelkectual stimulation. Our JC pays something like $1200 a class a semester, so she wasn't doing it for the money. I have another friend who quit a job as a music teacher but opened a piano/flute studio and have private lessons. She went back to work eventually as a part time music teacher at a rural school here but my guess is she's making more $$$ now as a private teacher in her own home. Her kids are the same age as mine.

My DBIL is an independent truck driver so that means no benefits.  My sister always worked for the medical benefits.    When she first started working it was only about 15 hours a week. Once she paid for her insurance she would come home with a bi-weekly paycheck of about $5.  It was very much worth it to their family.  

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Tue, 05-07-2013 - 8:32am

bordwithyou wrote:
Changing the answer a bit, but thinking back to the women I know who went part time when their kids were small, and realizing it wasn't always about the money. I had one friend who probably preferred not to work at all but who worked some minimum number of hours a year to keep her certification current. I think it was 160 hrs a year. She's a physical/occupational therapist. I have another who was a tax attorney who ended up teaching accounting classes at the local junior college two nights a week because she just needed the intelkectual stimulation. Our JC pays something like $1200 a class a semester, so she wasn't doing it for the money. I have another friend who quit a job as a music teacher but opened a piano/flute studio and have private lessons. She went back to work eventually as a part time music teacher at a rural school here but my guess is she's making more $$$ now as a private teacher in her own home. Her kids are the same age as mine.

I see, ptwah also has nonpecuniary benefits.  My friend's an at-home music teacher.  She volunteered that it's been hard making much money.  One year she told parents on the phone her rates were increasing to (what I would consider normal) and she lost a lot of students.  (I would pay a cleaning lady that amount.)  But she stuck with the increase otherwise it wasn't worth her while.  And her hours are limited to part-time, after children get out of school.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Tue, 05-07-2013 - 8:34am

emptynester2009 wrote:
  My DBIL is an independent truck driver so that means no benefits.  My sister always worked for the medical benefits.    When she first started working it was only about 15 hours a week. Once she paid for her insurance she would come home with a bi-weekly paycheck of about $5.  It was very much worth it to their family.   <br /></span></p><p><span style="font-family:comic sans ms,sans-serif; font-size:medium"></span></p>

Our crossing guards work 2 hours a day and get health insurance.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Tue, 05-07-2013 - 9:05am
Well, if you can have five students paying $40 an hour or four paying $50, the choice is pretty clear.