How do moms make money at part-time?

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
How do moms make money at part-time?
60
Mon, 05-06-2013 - 2:20pm

Questions: Is it financially meaningful to work part-time, especially some of the time from home, if kids are home with mom after school dismissal and summer/vacations.  If you presently work full-time but had to work mostly from your home office for a long term, to meet the needs of your family or your health, does your employer/home life allow for that?  And for how long?  "Forever"?

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Tue, 05-07-2013 - 4:50pm

pumpkinangel wrote:
<p>&lt;&lt;<span>Yes definitely.  You can't compare the mechanics of how you can work now to how they were 10+ years ago.&gt;&gt;</span></p><p><span>Exactly, which is why I asked for the basis in forming the opinion, if one was basing it on previous work experience even just a few years ago, things have changed.  If one is basing it on the industry that one previously worked (or works currently), it can vary vastly by the type of job even within the same industry or company.  I agee with your early post, I think being a lawyer wouldl be a profession that would hard to be manage part time.  A doctor would be another, although I've had a primary that only worked 3 days a week one week at one time until she cut back totally when she had another child.  Teaching I think would be easier with substituting at the elementary/high school level and part time professor at the college level. </span></p><p><span><br /></span></p>

By that reasoning, you can only speak to your little job, in your parochial (not a negative word, look it up) field of employment, in your little municipality.  When was the last time you performed open-heart surgery?  Under your reasoning, you had no idea surgeons actually do work part-time.  I thought everyone knew that.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Tue, 05-07-2013 - 5:07pm

litlmiss_cantbewrong wrote:
  Out of the many professions, lawyering seems like one of the last that one would be able to wah. Not that plenty couldn't be done at home (write briefs, so do legal research all can be done at home), but the whole one has to work 100 hours a week mentality.</p>

You'd be surprised.  Professionals with remote access to the office and libraries owned by the company/firm can work from home.  Your example of the lawyer writing briefs from home is a perfect example of what Marissa Mayer wants to curtail ~ Yahoo employees who "wah" but didn't log on for days.  Members of a firm asked by a client to explain a bill have to show the at-home lawyer used remote access for a solid X# of hours, the hours it took to write a brief, that a principal reviewed and discussed the brief; all of that's easier done to the satisfaction of a client if the at-home attorney was rather in the office. Smile

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Tue, 05-07-2013 - 5:10pm

litlmiss_cantbewrong wrote:
<p>Wow, that is amazing.  In our district you have to work 30 hours to get health insurance.  </p>

The coverage mustn't be that good.  The crossing guard who told me has been deteriorating (her hips, ankles) over the last 3 years.  (It's very sad.)

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2010
Tue, 05-07-2013 - 5:21pm

Ugh timekeeping.  I remember that well...glad I do not have to do that in my job any more.  Every once in awhile I get a stray thought like, did that take me .4 hours or .5 hours to work on that file?  Back when I had to fill out time slips they were on paper and there was no computer program following how long I worked on anything.  I bet they do now electronically...they probably have to put in the file number, do the work, log out that file number etc.  It was somewhat of a waste of time in my firm anyway.   Our clients were mainly banks who told us how much they would pay us, lol. Flat fee cases mostly.

“Clearly," said Arthur,"you're an idiot- but you're our kind of idiot. Come on.” 
― Markus ZusakThe Book Thief

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Wed, 05-08-2013 - 7:16am

I work at home part time and I make a meaningful financial contribution to my household. 

I don't always telecommute into a larger workplace and I don't limit my work effort to when my children aren't present. 

Sometimes I work for virtual workplaces. I spent the first half of last year writing travel guides for a company based out of Singapore. My project manager was based out of Denver and the rest of my writing team were located all over the native-English-speaking world.

Sometimes I telecommuite into physical workplaces. I spent the second half managing content and social media for a local small business with only three employees. I'm neither robbing my children of a mother nor robbing my client by writing a catchy tweet during the middle of preparing dinner or by writing the content of a hotel brochure instead of watching TV at night rather than arrive in a workplace and perform the same function from a cubicle between arbitrary hours. It takes five minutes to check a Google Analytics account, something I can do from a smartphone while sitting in line waiting to pick my kids up from school.

My husband can solve complicated IT issues from the golf course. Technology is awesome.

There's nothing wrong with preferring to separate your work and home life. I prefer the flexibility because it works well for my family and also with my variable ability as a student.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Wed, 05-08-2013 - 7:29am
I just thought of another part time/WAHM I know. She's a woman who worked for IT in our university and was mostly responsible for designing and updating web pages and also making sure that personal war pages are in conformance with university guidelines. She said that honestly, she had about thirty hours of work a week but was paid for forty. She was sometimes given a lot of departmental busywork to do, which she hated. So she wrote a consulting proposal, which saved her time and the university money. She now works as a contract employee, about 95% of the time from home. She's also taken on other clients, and makes more money than before, and seldom works over 30 hrs a week.
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Wed, 05-08-2013 - 9:43am

<<By that reasoning, you can only speak to your little job, in your parochial (not a negative word, look it up) field of employment, in your little municipality.  When was the last time you performed open-heart surgery?  Under your reasoning, you had no idea surgeons actually do work part-time.  I thought everyone knew that.>>

My little job, hmmm...interesting.  My reasoning is that working 10 years ago is different than today because of technology and that jobs can vary vastly depending on any number of things.  If you wish to disagree, feel free, but that is not a sound position to take in this debate.   Under my reasoning, if read correctly, surgeons could work part time.  


PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Wed, 05-08-2013 - 12:20pm

arryl wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">springfever2013</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;&lt;span style="font-size:13px; text-align:left"&gt;WAH all the time requires discipline and probably an adult without children!  Do you know any moms who exclusively wah? &lt;/span&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;span style="font-size:small"&gt;&lt;strong&gt;&lt;span style="text-align:left"&gt;One of my gfs WAH exclusively and has children BUT the kids ARE in school so I think that helps.&lt;/span&gt;&lt;/strong&gt;&lt;/span&gt;&lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>I do know a lady who used to be on the boards who is an attorney, she works contract work for the firm and works from home.  Her oldest is in kindergarten and the younger one is 3 and goes to preschool 2 days a week, but is home the rest of the time.  She does as much as she can during the day, but I know a lot of her brief writing and things she can do without needing client input, is done in the evenings once the kids go to sleep.</p>

That's interesting.  It's also a quality of life issue.  I sah and at the end of a day, I'm done!  I can't even imagine research and writing after 9pm. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013
Wed, 05-08-2013 - 5:11pm

My DH occasionally WAH. He finds he is more efficient b/c no one is bothering him like they do at the office. It isn't practical to do it a lot since he is in a supervisory role and needs to put in face time w/his employees, but it works for him occasionally. Yesterday he & I did some gardening, so WAH worked out really well for him. My mother WAH part time for a few years before she went back to work FT. She made enough money to make it worth her time and was able to be physically present if we needed her. It was an excellent transition for all us for her eventual return to FT employment.

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Wed, 05-08-2013 - 5:32pm

thardy2001 wrote:
That's interesting.  It's also a quality of life issue.  I sah and at the end of a day, I'm done!  I can't even imagine research and writing after 9pm.

Not everyone finds SAH as exhausting as you do.