How would you respond?

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-28-2007
How would you respond?
273
Sat, 01-26-2008 - 9:04pm

How would you respond if you were the teacher?


Recently, in my third grade class, we were having the "What do you want to be when you grow up?" conversation.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-25-2008
Mon, 01-28-2008 - 11:38am

Oh my God....what do you think the chances are of an 8 year old actually doing what they say they are going to do at 8?

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-04-1997
Mon, 01-28-2008 - 11:40am
I don't get it. It's the truth. Chances of ANYONE becoming a pro sports player are slim. If the teacher made it personal, as in "there's no way that YOU could do that because you just aren't up to speed" I'd be upset. But telling a kid that it's a really competitive field and not everyone who wants to play in the NFL gets to play in the NFL? I don't have a problem with that.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-25-2008
Mon, 01-28-2008 - 11:42am
But it's not a teachers place to say that....who cares what the chances are??
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-04-1997
Mon, 01-28-2008 - 11:42am
I'm pretty sure that most NFL players today were told numerous times that their chances of making it to the NFL were slim. They made it anyway. The kind of people that make it to the top echelons are gifted with both the natural talents AND the drive to succeed, to overcome obstacles. If you don't have both, you aren't going to make it.
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-30-2007
Mon, 01-28-2008 - 11:45am

I would not have an issue with a teacher telling a child that they would have to work very very hard to get into the nfl or what not and that they should have a back up plan in place with college (since the majority of pro players still come from college)


However I would not want a teacher just telling my child that the chance is slim.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-04-1997
Mon, 01-28-2008 - 11:46am
Silly me. I thought an educator's job was to educate. Telling a kid, "Wow, that's a high goal! It's hard to play in the NFL! You're going to have to work really hard to be competitive, because only the very best players get to play pro sports!" is not child abuse. And if a kid can be turned away from sports at 8 because he only wants to play if he can be Brett Favre is a kid who doesn't have the drive necessary to succeed, period.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-25-2008
Mon, 01-28-2008 - 11:46am

You just are not getting it.....I'm sure that those players were told that their chances were slim...MY POINT IS...you don't know how each child will respond individually....you don't know how that comment will affect them and their drive to play sports.


What if the child wanted to be an astronaut??

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-04-1997
Mon, 01-28-2008 - 11:48am
Telling a kid that the chances that they will achieve their dream is slim should not discourage the kid that really has that dream. I'd back it up with some 8 year old version of "there's always room at the top," because at eight, they are all dead sure they are going to be the top.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-25-2008
Mon, 01-28-2008 - 11:48am

Telling a child that any chance of fulfilling their dream is child abuse...children need encouragement.


it's a teachers job to educate...not to kill my childs dream.


they are 8....be serious.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-04-1997
Mon, 01-28-2008 - 11:53am

Funny thing is, one of my kids DID want to become an astronaut at age eight. He's eleven now. He's been fascinated with outer space most of his life. He reads biographies of the astronauts, has photos of all the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo astronauts on his walls, and his big dream in life right now is to visit the Kennedy Space Center and the Astronaut Hall of Fame in Florida. He's met Sally Ride in person --- even had lunch with her a few years back when she visited the campus where I teach. Last year we went to Chicago for spring break largely so that he could see the Jim Lovell exhibit at the Adler Planetarium. So you see I am not disparaging his dreams. What did I tell him when he was eight?

"Astronauts usually have some kind of degree in math or science. You're going to have to get good at math and science if you want to be an astronaut. And you are going to have to work out and be in good physical shape. It's hard to be an astronaut, and not everybody gets picked, but go for it. It's a good goal."

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