Iceland: Happiest people on earth

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Registered: 09-14-2006
Iceland: Happiest people on earth
7
Sun, 05-18-2008 - 2:39pm

Highest birth rate in Europe + highest divorce rate + highest percentage of women working outside the home = the best country in the world in which to live.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2008/may/18/iceland

These people have it right. No stigma against divorces or working moms. A true sense of the word family and community.

Could it be in part of little influence from Christian missionaries because of the remote location? In my eyes: most likely.




Edited 5/18/2008 2:40 pm ET by june774
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Tue, 05-20-2008 - 1:21pm

Actually Scandinavia, including Iceland, is not very diverse religiously. Most people, as the article says, belong to the state Lutheran church. If you go back a little (not so very much really) most Scandis, especially in rural and remote areas, practiced a rather forbidding brand of Christianity. Even now, there are fundamentalist groups scattered around. if you have a chance, rent the movie Barbara, or read the book. It takes place in the Faroe Islands, not Iceland, but it is a beautiful story and gives a decent glimpse of what life must have been like then in those out of the way places.

http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0118683/

As usual though, the book is better than the film: Jørgen-Frantz Jacobsen: Barbara, translated by George Johnston (Norwich, UK: Norvik Press, 1993) here is the wiki on the author: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jørgen-Frantz_Jacobsen

Avatar for mkatherine
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Tue, 05-20-2008 - 8:36am

I'm sure they're very happy in Iceland- there are a few Icelandic moms on my playgroup board and the photos they've posted and their stories about the country are really wonderful. I'd love to visit there someday.

 

Yes. We. Did.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-31-2005
Tue, 05-20-2008 - 8:28am


I didn't make either of those statements, so again you're making some pretty long leaps of logic. But either person MIGHT be bigoted, depending largely on whether the opinion was based on logic and reason or intolerance and illogical assumptions. However, the term "bigot" seems to apply to blind prejudice against a specific

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Mon, 05-19-2008 - 12:35pm

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Mon, 05-19-2008 - 12:33pm

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I doubt it, but you might want to read a bit more about

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-14-2006
Mon, 05-19-2008 - 12:19pm

So, Let me get this straight: If a Christian talks about lack of religion in today's youth as being the source of society's ills (just as an example) that is not bigoted? But if someone has a personal opinion that the attempt to spread Christianity to various tribes around the world over the course of the planets history is not a good thing... that is bigoted?

Gotta love those double standards hmm?

Actually, it must be nice to be religious and get to make all sorts of claims against people who do not think like you without anyone calling you bigoted. That must be why there are so many evangelists on TV.

But still, I am not here for a religious debate, because even though I do not believe in organized religion, it is still everyones right to practice what ever religion they want to.




Edited 5/19/2008 12:30 pm ET by june774
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-31-2005
Sun, 05-18-2008 - 11:54pm


For starters, you'd better study up on the history of Christianity. Christian missionaries, Irish monks, were the FIRST settlers of Iceland, in the 8th century. The Norse, who came later, formally adopted Christianity around 1000 A.D. While it's true that Christianity didn't reach Iceland until much later than continental Europe, your assumption that Christianity played little role in Iceland's history is erroneous.


But even assuming that Christianity (i.e., the state church) plays little role in the every day lives of modern Icelanders, which from what I understand is generally true in the