If you had Scandinavian bennies ...

Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
If you had Scandinavian bennies ...
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Mon, 04-19-2010 - 7:40am
I am curious. If you had Scandinavian social benefits – 1 year of paid parental leave, free health care and dental/ortho for the kids, no future college costs as well as subsidized daycare and after school care – would it affect your decision about SAH or WOH, either way?

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What would men be without women? Scarce, sir, mighty scarce.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Mon, 04-19-2010 - 8:43am
Yes. If I didn't have to worry about health care or college costs, I would SAH. Whether or not I would work after that would depend on whether or not I decide to homeschool. If they go to school, I would go back to work part time.













Edited 4/19/2010 9:24 am ET by finally.me




Avatar for mommy2amani
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Registered: 03-26-2003
Mon, 04-19-2010 - 8:55am

I'd still work, but I imagine my taxes would be higher.


For us, we might have less disposable income, because we wouldn't be putting out as much (our health and dental insurance costs are relatively low), but our taxes would go up to cover the plan for everyone.


iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2000
Mon, 04-19-2010 - 8:55am

I'm not sure I understand the question. Are those things only available if I continued to WOH after the parental leave is up or would they go away should I decide to quit after having kids?

I can't really answer anyway as it would really be situation dependent. There were many reasons I decided to SAH, which happened after my second child was born, but the biggest influence in the decision is that my dh was traveling extensively for weeks at a time and the job that I had required me to work outside of normal business hours, such that my kids would have to be in child care for more hours than I was willing to use.

We also knew we wanted a large family which would be more difficult to manage if I were WOHFT.

In order to answer this question, it would really depend on the type of jobs that dh and I had, and how flexible they were.

Looking back, if dh and I had only wanted two (maybe three) kids and if we both had a different jobs after the second was born, I probably would have continued to work.

As your question is worded though, there are too many unanswered variables in order for me to answer it with a simple "I would SAH" or "I would WOH."

Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Mon, 04-19-2010 - 9:14am
Yes, your taxes would most likely be higher. Do you save for college?

*^*^*^*^*

What would men be without women? Scarce, sir, mighty scarce.

Mark Twain

Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Mon, 04-19-2010 - 9:16am
Fair enough. BTW, many of the family friendly laws were passed in the hope that people would have more kids. It helped for a bit, but right now the birth rate is negative there, as it is in the rest of Europe.

*^*^*^*^*

What would men be without women? Scarce, sir, mighty scarce.

Mark Twain

Avatar for mommy2amani
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Registered: 03-26-2003
Mon, 04-19-2010 - 9:48am

<Yes, your taxes would most likely be higher. Do you save for college?>


Yes, I forgot about that part.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-22-2009
Mon, 04-19-2010 - 9:59am

Yes,

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Mon, 04-19-2010 - 10:49am

I would have been ecstatic to be home for a year after each of my kids was born. I found pumping to be a real pain in the butt. I don't think our SAH/WOH arrangement would change very much though.

ETA: But the subsidized day care (how much is it subsidized?) would be awfully nice. This fall we're going to be paying almost as much in child care as we do for housing.




Edited 4/19/2010 11:12 am ET by geschichtsgal
Avatar for mommy2amani
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Registered: 03-26-2003
Mon, 04-19-2010 - 11:57am


We always paid more for child care than we did for housing, even when we only had one.

Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Mon, 04-19-2010 - 12:28pm

To be honest, I am not sure how it would break down exactly. Basically, you get one set of degrees "for free," tuition paid plus a small living grant. If you are accepted for a PH.D you get a proper salary while you are in the program and writing your dissertation. If you decide later in life that you want to start over and that engineering just isn't you, then you do have to pay tuition, although the tuition is subsidized, so it is still cheaper than in the US for most things. That is for the strictly academic programs. If you train as a carpenter or plumber, that is also paid for by the state.

However, I really don't know what percentage of an average tax payer's taxes goes to pay for all this. The idea is that making education/training accessible contributes to overall productivity and affluence and is therefore in everyone's best interest.

*^*^*^*^*

What would men be without women? Scarce, sir, mighty scarce.

Mark Twain

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