Is it possible to make good $$ from home

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-23-2009
Is it possible to make good $$ from home
70
Tue, 07-21-2009 - 9:05am

Is it REALLY possible to make decent money working from home? I'm not talking about those of you who have employers who let you telecommute, nor am I talking about those of you who are attorneys or accountants who work from home some or even most of the time. I'm talking about all the myriad of WAH ideas I see scattered all over the place.


I've done direct sales. I did pretty good at it, but I never worked my way up. I ended up quitting because the company made a change that would've cut into my profits even more, and I didn't feel that I could continue to make money at it. And even though I did "pretty good", it wasn't anywhere near enough to "replace your job" as they so often claim. And then I do psychic readings on LivePerson when I'm home. I do well--good ratings and a pretty good flow of clients--but I still might only earn $500 or so a month. That's great for extra cash, but it's by no means enough to replace a full-time income.


One of my girlfriends does one of those remote call center gigs. When you call to place an order from a magazine, your call is routed to people like my friend, who work from home. She makes about $500 a month--again, not too shabby, but certainly not a full-time income.


You look all around the Internet and you see thousands of offers wanting you to "work from home", but are any of these actually legit? Can you actually earn a full-time income from home without any professional skills (and by "professional", I mean like a doctor, lawyer, accountant, etc.)? The only women I've ever known that truly DID make a "full-time income" from home were adult entertainers (webcam girls and phone sex operators). I know that in any business, there will be those women at the top who are earning lots and lots of money, but those are the exception to the rule.


The reason I bring this up is that I encountered someone this past week and we had a conversation. I said that I wished employers were more accommodating of the needs of their employees, particularly those who have children or are caring for aging parents. He said that in a market economy, if your employer is not treating you right, you go somewhere else. If your employer loses enough people, he'll wake up and start implementing more family-friendly policies. My response was that almost EVERY employer treats their workers like wage-slaves and the only way to get away from it would be to WAH. I don't think that many people can WAH and make the same as they would WOH. He said that it is possible to make just as much WAH as WOH. I disagree. Who is right?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Wed, 08-19-2009 - 11:38am

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Yes, if you didn't go to college I could see how that would be a valid concern with regard to educating others. It still shouldn't be a problem for the elementary school subjects, though. And you'd be surprised how little education some teachers have in actually teaching. College professors aren't required to have any teacher certification at all, and many K-12 teachers got alternative certification after taking just two classes (they had a bachelor's in something else). Just so you know.

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That's usually all you need to be a good educator. It means you would do your research and be thorough and enthusiastic.

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Yes, that is a good reason.

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Why would they be isolated at home? Do you isolate your children by not putting them in daycare? Of course not. Homeschooled children are involved in clubs, sports, scouts and all sorts of other activities. Only a portion of their education takes place within the walls of their home.

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I really would recommend thinking about it. You could try it for a year just to see how it goes. In the meantime you might find and contact your local homeschool association to get an accurate picture of what homeschooling entails. It just seems like something you would really enjoy and that would mesh well with your ideals.










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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Wed, 08-19-2009 - 2:15pm

Educating one's children instead of turning that responsibility over to a third party.

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Wed, 08-19-2009 - 2:17pm

<<Maybe if I were a qualified teacher I would have thought about it but as I am not they go to school.>>


How is this statement not a contradiction to all of your other statements on raising children?


IMO, education is a large part of raising children.


PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Wed, 08-19-2009 - 2:21pm

A third party, the school system.


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Curious, what qualifications do you believe are needed to be a parent?


PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Wed, 08-19-2009 - 2:40pm
Well, one of the two daycare providers we used (we used a mother-daughter team) was also degreed, but we didn't use her because she had a degree in preschool education and we didn't. We used her because we needed supplementary care when the kids were small. If you need outside help teaching your children then by all means choose someone with the appropriate qualifications. Many dedicated parents, however, aren't willing to turn over this important responsibility to strangers, however impressive their qualifications.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-24-2005
Wed, 08-19-2009 - 4:00pm

I am a loving and hopefully nurturing parent.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Wed, 08-19-2009 - 4:06pm

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Replace the word "teacher" with "daycare provider" and replace "homeschool" with "militant SAHMs" and you can hear what you've been sounding like to most of us working moms.










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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Wed, 08-19-2009 - 4:07pm

I think you are being incredibly judgemental about why parents would choose to homeschool, particularly since you'd never heard of it until a few days ago. Just like you are judgemental about parents who choose to use daycare. Both homeschooling and daycare can be positive influences in a child's life, not stopgap measures or indications of some kind of parenting pathology.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Wed, 08-19-2009 - 4:48pm

You simply can't use "I'm not qualified" as your excuse.
Doctors, dentists and therapists require 5-7 years of training beyond the bachelor's degree in order to do their jobs. My mother taught at an expensive private school for almost a decade with no special training (and definitely not certified). She just retired, though they begged her not to leave.

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Daycare is also an available service that many parents use to ensure that their children's needs are being met. Using daycare is no better or worse than using formal schools. Any argument that you use against daycare applies equally to using formal school.










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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-05-2000
Wed, 08-19-2009 - 8:05pm

"I think parents who think they are better then are scared to let go of their children and rather then being a positive role model are instead scared to let go of their children and trust them to make good decisions regarding school life. A parent's job is to learn to let go and I seriously feel that shows a lack of ability to do this."

Your quote (edited and altered by me) shows a lack of knowledge both about daycare and homeschool.

Chris

The truth may be out there but lies are in your head. Terry Pratchett

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