Living under a rock...how do they do

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-23-2003
Living under a rock...how do they do
331
Thu, 03-06-2008 - 11:57am
it?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 10-31-2005
Sat, 03-08-2008 - 3:03pm


ITA--in the early days of our country's settlement, teachers were usually young women of 15 or 16--judging from curriculum standards I've seen from back then, these teachers were

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-31-2005
Sat, 03-08-2008 - 3:11pm


What I would like to see, perhaps, is at least require the parent to submit to the local school district a plan for that year's education--what textbooks/curriculum is being used--not necessarily weekly lesson plans, but some kind of documentation to help weed out the small percentage of parents who use hs as an excuse.


Also, I wouldn't have a problem with the state mandating testing for both private and public schools each year in at least math, reading, and writing (if they were willing to fund it)--this would help parents measure their children's progress and would also alert the local district to potential abuses of homeschooling privileges. I don't think hs generally would have a problem with that, as I'm guessing the majority would score higher than their private school counterparts or at least be able to demonstrate measurable progress from year to year.

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Sat, 03-08-2008 - 3:40pm

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I don't think that's a good idea at all. If school districts had to approve textbooks/curriculum, it would require school district involvement that many homeschooling parents are trying to avoid in the first place. Not to mention that it would be fairly easy to submit a form with a list of textbooks and never use them. I much prefer a system that requires homeschooling students to either take standardized tests or submit portfolios.

ETA: For example, if I were in charge of the approving curriculum of homeschooling parents for my district, I would not in good conscience be able to approve a creation science curriculum. However, I do feel parents should be able to teach their children that if they choose.




Edited 3/8/2008 3:44 pm ET by geschichtsgal
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sat, 03-08-2008 - 4:22pm
Yes, I agree. I went to a college that had started out as a teacher's college back in the day. One of the years I was there was the 100th anniversary of the place. To celebrate the anniversary the library was decorated with samples of the exams prospective teachers had to pass to ENTER the school back when it started. That same year there was a huge controversy over the fact that the college had introduced, as a GRADUATION requirement, the writing of a 500-word essay. The graduation essay was considered "unfair" because some students had passed 4 years of classes, yet failed the essay and that couldn't be right (insert eye roll). After going through the old entrance exams, I estimated that 80-90% of the then enrolled students would fail those exams. The college obviously wasn't Harvard, but still.
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-31-2005
Sat, 03-08-2008 - 5:02pm


I didn't say that the burden would be on the district to approve the textbooks or the curriculum, simply that I would be okay with the parent having to submit SOMETHING each year. Then the district/CPS could go after the very worst

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-12-2005
Sat, 03-08-2008 - 5:24pm

The district needs to focus its attention on educating the children in its charge. When they are doing a perfect job in that regard, then they can play big brother to the homeschooling population.


As a homeschooling parent,I resent the idea that my parenting decisions need to be overseen by the school district,an entity that isn't itself doing a perfect job in educating the children in its care. I also resent that my decision to homeschool my children is automatically treated as suspect because it doesn't fit in with what the majority chooses.

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Sat, 03-08-2008 - 5:56pm
I think it would be detrimental to families who use non-traditional schooling methods and would not do any more to ensure parents understand that the state has a vested interest in the education of all students than requiring standardized testing or portfolio assessments would.
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iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Sat, 03-08-2008 - 6:00pm
I agree. While there are some homeschooled kids who slip through the cracks, there are far more state schooled kids who slip through the cracks. On the other hand, while this thread is speaking specifically about state involvement in homeschooling, I think that most states pay far more attention to state schooled kids' performances than to homeschooled kids' performances.
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iVillage Member
Registered: 10-31-2005
Sat, 03-08-2008 - 7:22pm
I should be clear--I am in favor of less intervention by the state, not more. I was trying to think through a way California might fulfill its apparent desire for more governmental
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Sat, 03-08-2008 - 8:05pm
If the child cannot demonstrate that he or she has learned age-appropriate material either by scoring well enough on a standardized test or submitting an adequate portfolio assessment, the parent is obviously NOT fulfilling his or her educational responsibility to the child. (Learning disabilities should, of course, be taken into account when evaluating the scores of the standardized test or portfolio.)
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