Modern fairy tales

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-08-2003
Modern fairy tales
541
Fri, 10-03-2008 - 4:41pm

Is it time we put aside Cinderalla et al. and find more modern fairy tales that reflect on the difficulties facing women in our time? That its probably not the best idea to wait around for Mr. Right to sweep you away and meet your every need forever?


I don't much care if a woman decides she wants to be

Pages

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-04-2007
Fri, 10-31-2008 - 9:14am
Good for you but exceptions don't prove the rule.
Avatar for mkatherine
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Fri, 10-31-2008 - 9:43am

Ah I kinda love the disney movies -- I love that Belle is stubborn and obsessed with books and turns down the handsome stud for the intellectual shy beast.

 

Yes. We. Did.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Fri, 10-31-2008 - 10:12am

We have too many young women who are obsessed with weight due to growing up with images of super skinny princesses


ITA.

 

Avatar for mom34101
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Fri, 10-31-2008 - 10:25am

Sorry, but this isn't a "rule." This is just your opinion, which is even contradicted by your own experience. You've been hit with plenty of bad luck. You say you're still on track to retire, despite a late start, working pt during some years, and now switching to a much lower-paying job. You're not a teacher because you "got lucky"; just the opposite-- you're a teacher because you got laid off and couldn't get another engineering job. And now you suggest that you can do all this even with the current economic climate, in which many people have lost 1/3 of their retirement funds.

If you can do what you've done, and still have enough money to retire, a sahm can take a few years off and do the same. Wake up--educated women *are* taking time off, and they *can* make up for it financially, just as you've done. They're not going to have the same retirement they'd have if they worked as engineers for 40 years without a break--but neither are you.

And I'd love to hear who's going to hire a seasonal automotive engineer in Detroit.

Avatar for mom34101
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Fri, 10-31-2008 - 10:39am

It's amazing that your retirement is "taken care of" after only 18 years of working (some of them pt), your late start, and the current state of the stock market. But if you can do it in 18 years, it's obvious that taking a couple of years off is no big deal financially.

Avatar for mom34101
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Fri, 10-31-2008 - 10:40am
Reading is a passive activity? Links, please.
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Fri, 10-31-2008 - 10:45am

I wasn't encouraging people to take risks, only suggesting that not making an income is not the only risk out there. Money is hugely important, of course, but it's not everything. I know of one retired couple in which the wife only worked for a short time and still managed to retire in Hawaii. My parents, OTOH, both worked for much of my childhood, but because of some unexpected setbacks (illnesses, etc), aren't living as well as they might like.


This is by no means an argument against working hard, saving, and being careful--I'm simply pointing out that even if you do those things, bad things can still happen, but the fear of those bad things shouldn't prevent you from staying home or working or whatever you choose to do now. Obviously, if one partner makes $100K in a high COL area, staying home isn't a very wise option. But even then, I can see situations in which it might be better for one partner not to work (care of an elderly family member, etc.)


DH is a VP (used to be an SVP but took a lower level job so that we wouldn't have to move) at a Fortune 100 company, yes, but we do have a number of expenses related to family members in crisis, so we live modestly and frugally. And like everyone else, we've taken a massive beating on the stock market. I take nothing for granted, but don't see how my returning to a decent-paying job will help us more than I do now. The help I provide is in a different area.


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-04-2007
Fri, 10-31-2008 - 11:00am

No, it's a fact of life.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-04-2007
Fri, 10-31-2008 - 11:15am

That's because I had a lot more income than I needed and took care of it.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-04-2007
Fri, 10-31-2008 - 11:16am
Being read to is a passive activity.

Pages