Modern fairy tales

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-08-2003
Modern fairy tales
541
Fri, 10-03-2008 - 4:41pm

Is it time we put aside Cinderalla et al. and find more modern fairy tales that reflect on the difficulties facing women in our time? That its probably not the best idea to wait around for Mr. Right to sweep you away and meet your every need forever?


I don't much care if a woman decides she wants to be

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iVillage Member
Registered: 10-04-2007
Fri, 10-31-2008 - 11:19am

There are always exceptions to the rule but they do

Avatar for mkatherine
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Fri, 10-31-2008 - 11:24am
wow....I"m sorry you're that unimaginative that you consider reading to be passive.... I think it's one of the most engaging ways to make ones imagination soar....

Jesus was a

 

Yes. We. Did.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-23-2003
Fri, 10-31-2008 - 11:53am

Ummm no purpose for fairy tales?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Fri, 10-31-2008 - 1:17pm
You are so focused on Prince Charming you are not noticing the other recurring character in these fairytales- the Evil Stepmother. (Her recurrence ticks off actual stepmothers, but that's a whole 'nother subject.) In all these fairytales there is a powerful and evil matriarchal figure- a faux mother who is either a stepmother or a witch. And she's where the real utility of these fairytales lies. They let kids think about anger against and revenge against a bad faux mother who hurts them which lets them safely vent their angry feelings about being scolded or punished without consciously feeling ill will towards their own IRL mother. It's really about sublimating angry feelings through
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Fri, 10-31-2008 - 1:19pm
Reading (or being read to) encourages visualization- a form of creativity.
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-18-2008
Fri, 10-31-2008 - 2:41pm
I read fairy tales to my grand daughters (who both have mothers who have careers outside of the home) because reading to a child encourages them to use their imaginations...they "picture" stories as I read to them...and, they are very clever for their ages...and, they realize that I am reading fairy tales...whimsical stories about make believe...but, if one of them finds a partner that encourages them to be whatever they want to be (even a stay at home mother) I would support them completely...I have been very fortunate to have found my knight in shinning armour who has supported my pursuit of my degree and will support me in any manner whether I choose to stay at home, pursue a career outside of the home, or pursue my real dream and open a home catering business...













iVillage Member
Registered: 10-04-2007
Fri, 10-31-2008 - 2:53pm
Not when you're being told what to visualize.
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Fri, 10-31-2008 - 3:04pm

"Roll" playing? Is that where you're given a piece of dough and get to mold into any shape you want?


Think you meant role playing. And reading, for most imaginative people, can fuel it.

Avatar for mkatherine
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Fri, 10-31-2008 - 3:08pm
who tells you what to visualize?

 

Yes. We. Did.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Fri, 10-31-2008 - 3:12pm

You can't be serious! Most children of reasonable intelligence know the difference between fantasy and reality. Reading a story about a myth or a civilization that never really existed is hardly going to give a child unrealistic expectations. Surely you don't really believe there's no room for escapist fantasy or myth in a child's life?


A child without this is living in poverty, no matter how much money her family has.

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