More She Earns, Less Household Burden

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Registered: 03-26-2003
More She Earns, Less Household Burden
3
Thu, 09-06-2007 - 12:48am

WOMEN'S MONEY MATTERS: EARNINGS AND HOUSEWORK IN DUAL-EARNERS FAMILIES?
Gupta
CCF Briefing Paper: New Findings on Women's Earnings and Housework
September 4, 2007

Media contact: Stephanie Coontz
coontzs@msn.com; 360 556-9223

Chicago, Sept. 4 -- What reduces women's
housework burden? A new study shows that on average it
doesn't have much to do with her husband's help or his
earnings, but how much money SHE earns. The more she earns,
the less housework she does.

THE OLD NEWS: For over a decade, people who study how men
and women share (or don't share) housework offered a
depressing answer to the question of when a woman can expect
to stop doing the lion's share of housework. The data
suggested that when women earned as much or more than their
male partners, they did MORE housework.

THE NEW NEWS: A new study from Professor Sanjiv Gupta
(University of Massachusetts-Amherst) suggests a different
answer: Whether she earns more or less than her partner
makes little difference; what influences her share of
housework is simply how much she earns herself. In a
briefing report to the Council on Contemporary Families,
Professor Gupta reports that for every $7,500 in additional
income, a woman's share of housework declines by one hour
per week.

THE GOOD NEWS: One interpretation of the earlier finding
was that successful women were so threatening to their
husbands that the men actually cut back on housework to
salvage their masculine pride, or the women took on more
housework to build up their husbands' egos. The new findings
challenge that view.

THE DOWNSIDE: It isn't all rosy: Although there has been
a significant rise in the number of households where men and
women share chores equally, regardless of their relative
earnings, old assumptions about women's responsibility for
household work remain very widespread. Gupta points out that
in most cases, "not only do women spend more time on
everyday housework than do their husbands, they also appear
to draw only upon their own earnings to cut down on it, not
their husbands.'"

http://www.contemporaryfamilies.org/subtemplate.php?t=briefingPapers&ext=womenshousework

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Thu, 09-06-2007 - 12:17pm
This raised some interesting points, but I think there's a lot more research to be done to prove a link between increased income and decreased housework in women.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Thu, 09-06-2007 - 1:58pm
There was quite a bit more to the article at the link provided. Although, I agree that one study does not prove the point, it is interesting at the very least.

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I am unable ot give legal or medical advice. My opinions are based on my experiences and my personal research.


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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Fri, 09-07-2007 - 11:53am
I read the entire article. Causation was correlated no where in the article.

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