Is this necessary??

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Is this necessary??
52
Fri, 08-01-2003 - 11:15am
I was talking to a mother of a newborn yesterday. We were discussing childcare. Her DD will be 12 weeks old when Mom goes back to work. She and her DH have decided to pay an astronomical sum of money (in my opinion. I realize a dollar means different things to different people.) to hire a graduate student with an undergrad degree in ECD, ( Grad degree in unrelated field), to take care of their infant while they work. I was surprised because this mother thinks that a large part of what a SAHM does all day is "simply babysitting." Yet they are gushing about having a degreed caregiver.

My question is do you think it aids an infants development to have a caregiver with a BA degree in ECD?

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Avatar for biancamami
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
In reply to: marz2
Fri, 08-01-2003 - 11:26am
It certainly can't hurt....but for a 3 month old? That is so way over the top IMO!

First, having a degree in child development I don't think *guarantees* a good caregiver. She has "book" learning as they say....but does she have experience?

What a newborn needs is love, attention, a soothing presence, food, and plenty of time to SLEEP without being overstimulated. Their development is automatic if these elements are present. What can a grad student possibly DO with a newborn to aid her development? I just don't see anything in the care of an infant that requires this kind of knowledge. I rather take a woman who has been caring for newborns for years, who knows how to deal with gas issues, who knows how to get a colicky baby to fall asleep...etc. etc. A person who knows about child development through observation, experience, and a "knack" for relating to children. To me, that is much more valuable than someone who can quote Piaget to me! LOL

Ana
Avatar for tickmich
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
In reply to: marz2
Fri, 08-01-2003 - 11:33am
Well, I dont think its absolutely necessary that a daycare provider have a BA. My dcp has some college but doesnt have a degree yet.

Around here, all decent daycare providers with experience charge an astronomical amount especially if it is for care of infants. There arent many places/providers that take infants and those that do charge more for them.

When I was looking for daycare, I found one family daycare provider who was cheap but I didnt like her at all. There was one daycare center that was also less expensive but it was rundown.

The bottom line was that I chose a daycare provider that I thought was caring, reliable and knowledgeable.
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-21-2003
In reply to: marz2
Fri, 08-01-2003 - 11:38am
Not at all. IMO they'd be better off with an uneducated mom with lots of experience in raising children.
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-20-2001
In reply to: marz2
Fri, 08-01-2003 - 12:55pm
MHO is yes, but caution parents that a degreed caregiver isn't a given that that degree promises quality of care ... knowledge is one thing, application is another.

I wish I knew when I first had my ds 24yrs ago what I have learned over the last five years.

Linda

 

Linda - wife, mother, grandmum                     &nb

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
In reply to: marz2
Fri, 08-01-2003 - 12:58pm
No, what you need in a caregiver is someone with a caring nuturing side that understands children. Our pick would've been for someone with EXPERIENCE raising and caring for children, not necessarily someone who "took a class" on "how to care for children".

I'd take a sahm with no degree who has raised her children before I hired a just out of school person with a BA in Early Childhood Education.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-29-1999
In reply to: marz2
Fri, 08-01-2003 - 1:05pm
Is it necessary at this age? No. BUT If the parents' intentions include keeping this person hired on until the child reaches Kindergarten so that the child has one consistant, loving caregiver throughout the early stages, then I think it is smart to look for the qualities you'll want later, now.

Avatar for cyndiluwho
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
In reply to: marz2
Fri, 08-01-2003 - 1:17pm
I'd prefer someone who actually has studied child development to someone who was winging it myself. Our first dcp was not degreed but it was in a center where the center had a set program. Our last dcp was degreed. I'm impressed with her understanding of early childhood development and have learned a lot from her. I am so glad we have had her in our lives.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
In reply to: marz2
Fri, 08-01-2003 - 1:23pm
I would think twice about hiring a grad student with a degree in anything. Unless I felt this woudl be a long term committment she would take seriously. My experience with grad students is that their schedules change every semester, so while she might be available at certain times this term, next term they might offer a class she needs in teh middle of teh day. And ususally in grad school, you need to take those classes when they are offered, since many times the schedule cycles and the same class might not be taught for a year or more. And most grad students I know are looking for any type of assistanship taht woudl help them with their tuition, so if that grad student landed an assistanship, she woudl probably be obligated to teach several sections of undergrad classes. Seems like a scheduling nightmare in the long run.

Susan

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
In reply to: marz2
Fri, 08-01-2003 - 1:24pm
My kids were 12 weeks when I returned to work - and my day care provider at the time was a woman who had barely finished high school, but had 4 kids between the ages of 10 and 19. She had definately "been there and done that", with wisdom and advice you can't find in a college text book.
Avatar for biancamami
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
In reply to: marz2
Fri, 08-01-2003 - 1:29pm
How does not having studied child development equal "winging it"?

My Nanny has never had a formal education aside from HS in her country. She comes from very humble circusmtances. But she has so much experience with children. And even though I have taken several classes in child development and psychology, none of that taught me how to get her down for a nap for three hours!

You can learn just as much from an experienced caregiver (probably more) than from someone with a degree. Now, if they have both, that's great. But at my DD's age what she needs most is love, attention, discipline, and someone who has experience with children.

Ana

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