No napping allowed?

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
No napping allowed?
116
Wed, 07-13-2011 - 2:14pm

What do you think about this?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Mon, 07-18-2011 - 3:13pm
With younger tens, you or another parent is still driving them places, so their "curfew" is whenever you go pick them up and bring them home. When my older son got to be about seventeen and wanted to go, there was always a negotiation of where are you going, who will be driving, and when are you coming back? If there were changes in plans, my kid was supposed to notify me. I was lucky in that he had a good group of friends, and the parents all worked together with similar rules, so if for instance they were all over at my house on a Saturday evening watching a movie and it got to be midnight and I knew the kids had told their parents they'd be home around midnight, I could go down and say, "Is the movie about over? Do you need to call your parents and say you won't be leaving for another ten minutes?" Somehow it all worked out. I hope it's as smooth with my younger one.
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2010
Mon, 07-18-2011 - 3:14pm
My kids and I talk about rules all of the time. We live by belief that the intent of a rule is what's important...not necissarily the rule it's self. And, if there is a rule, there is a reason for it, that is clealry understood. Throwing out an arbitrary curfew doesn't seem to be very well thought out. Discussing and adhering to an appropriate time to be home, on a case by case basis, helps them set the limits themselves, and gives meaning and intent to the *rule*.
Avatar for cmpat
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-21-2003
Mon, 07-18-2011 - 4:05pm
Good points.. I think the word curfew could be replaced with 'guideline' in a lot of cases. For example, the town we live in has a curfew of 12pm for residents age 15 and under. Here, 'curfew' basically means if an RCMP officer sees young people walking the streets or in a public place without an adult guardian after 12 they will ask the kids why they're out and usually drive them to their homes. It's not as strict as word as 'rule' because breaking rules generally comes with a consequence. This curfew basically gives our peace officers the liberty to ask children why they are out and see to their safety ...
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iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2007
Mon, 07-18-2011 - 4:21pm

"i'm sorry if your experiences are different. "

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2007
Mon, 07-18-2011 - 4:22pm

I think it can happen when they become mobile.

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Mon, 07-18-2011 - 5:26pm

That is a big difference where we live. Out in the burbs, people have to drive their kids everywhere as you describe, but in town, the kids get around by themselves, either on foot or with public transportation.

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Mon, 07-18-2011 - 5:30pm

The way I read it, that is what she is sorry about, that you and your children have not had the experience of a curfew.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Mon, 07-18-2011 - 6:05pm

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Mon, 07-18-2011 - 6:18pm

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2010
Mon, 07-18-2011 - 6:21pm
Yep, here too.

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